Anne Parr PRO TRAINER  FIS   

          
"
   

Blog

CHALLENGES RELATED TO DIET, NUTRITION, AND EXERCISE IN DIABETES

Posted on February 26, 2021 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)

CHALLENGES RELATED TO DIET, NUTRITION, AND EXERCISE IN DIABETES

Twitter

 

 

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM ©2021

https://us.humankinetics.com/blogs/nutrition-and-healthy-eating-webinars/challenges-related-to-diet-nutrition-and-exercise-in-diabetes?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nutrition-feb21&dlv-emuid=c8f00eaf-34d6-418a-b1d3-26459c5785a8&dlv-mlid=2783579" target="_blank">YOU MUST LOG IN TO WATCH THIS WEBINAR RECORDING.

 

Lifestyle changes adopted to manage diabetes and prediabetes include not only more physical activity, but also improvements in diet and nutrition. One trend that many are following is low-carb eating, but that can impact a person's ability to be active and perform well. Learn the ins and outs of dietary plans, adequate nutrition, and select supplements on your or your clients' exercise programming. 

 

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM, is an author, exercise physiologist, lecturer, consultant, and professor emerita of exercise science (Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia). In 2016, she was the recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes award. A respected researcher and lecturer, she has authored more than 400 articles on exercise, diabetes, and health; 28 book chapters; and over a dozen books, including Diabetes-Free Kids, The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan, 50 Secrets of the Longest Living People With Diabetes, The Science of Staying Young, Diabetic Athlete’s Handbook, The Diabetes Breakthrough, and Diabetes & Keeping Fit for Dummies.

 

A distinguished graduate of Stanford University (BA), University of California at Davis (MA), and University of California at Berkeley (PhD), Colberg consults professionally for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) on numerous committees and projects. As a world-renowned expert and opinion leader, she has developed the exercise guidelines related to diabetes for most of these premier professional organizations, and she is interviewed frequently by various media outlets. In addition, she continues to be involved in consulting and in clinical research on exercise, diabetes, and healthy lifestyles.

 

With over 50 years of personal experience as an exerciser living with type 1 diabetes, Colberg continues to live a healthy, active lifestyle and serve as a role model for others who want to live long and well with (or without) diabetes. She enjoys working out regularly on conditioning machines, swimming, biking, fitness walking, weight training, and hiking with her husband and family in coastal California.


Sharing from Human Kinetics

National Pancake day

Posted on February 16, 2021 at 8:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The key ingredient to the perfect breakfast, this February 16 get yourself a mouth-watering stack toward heaven because it’s National Pancake Day!

Observed annually in Spring, and since beginning its first celebration in 2006, IHOP restaurants have raised over $24 million to support charities in the communities in which they operate.

We grew up observing Pancake Tuesday it prepares you for fasting for 40 days in LENT.

National Pancake Day is celebrated on February 16 every year. A thin flat cake prepared with a batter made from milk, eggs, flour, and oil or butter, the pancake and its variations are found in almost every culture.

Also known as Johnnycakes, griddle cakes or hotcakes, this batter-made breakfast item dates back more than 30,000 years. In fact, it may be the oldest breakfast food in history, spanning as far back as the Stone Age and even found in the stomach of Otzi the Iceman, who’s human remains are estimated to be 5,300 years old.

 

The Middle English word ‘pancake’ first appeared in English in the 15th century however, Ancient Greeks and Romans made what were called Alita Dolcia or “another sweet” with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk. Greek Poets, Cratinus and Magnes wrote about them in their poetry and Shakespeare mentions them in his famous plays. During the English Renaissance, pancakes were flavored with spices, rosewater, sherry, and apples. This practice of pouring batter on a pan and frying it is common in nearly every culture around the world.

 

In the UK, they’ve celebrated Shrove Tuesday since 1100 A.D. It is the day before Ash Wednesday, also referred to in other places as Fat Tuesday. This very popular Feast Day is observed through participating in confession, finalizing a lenten sacrifice, as well as consuming pancakes and other sweets.

 

This year guests from around the country will once again celebrate National Pancake Day at IHOP and enjoy a free short stack of Buttermilk pancakes. In return for the free pancakes, guests will be asked to consider leaving a donation to designated local charities. This is your opportunity to contribute to your community and enjoy a delicious meal. Don’t miss out!

https://nationaltoday.com/national-pancake-day/?utm_source=vero&utm_medium=email&utm_content=b&utm_campaign=Feb%2015th%20Newsletter&utm_term=Newsletter&vero_id=smihlen%40dandsi.com&vero_conv=QtTLRrle1_K21ZvULOuBqe6ZGnxDGjgTH9Bl2v-i-vBblv_jM6sUmc64xGrs_0OFPFwnGHPDGCzNqNw_ESAtNdH8lU68vdgd9A%3D%3D" target="_blank">https://nationaltoday.com/national-pancake-day/?utm_source=vero&utm_medium=email&utm_content=b&utm_campaign=Feb%2015th%20Newsletter&utm_term=Newsletter&vero_id=smihlen%40dandsi.com&vero_conv=QtTLRrle1_K21ZvULOuBqe6ZGnxDGjgTH9Bl2v-i-vBblv_jM6sUmc64xGrs_0OFPFwnGHPDGCzNqNw_ESAtNdH8lU68vdgd9A%3D%3D

How to survive a heart attack when you are alone!

Posted on February 15, 2021 at 2:30 PM Comments comments (0)

I hope everyone can send this on as it is really important for everyone to know!

1. Let's say it's 7:25 pm and you're going home (alone of course) after an unusually hard day on the job.

2. You're really tired, upset and frustrated.

3. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to drag out into your arm and up into your jaw.

  You are only about five km from the hospital nearest your home.

4. Unfortunately you don't know if you'll be able to make it that far.

5. You have been trained in CPR, but the guy that taught the course did not tell you how to perform it on yourself.

6. HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE?

Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousnes.

7. However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously.

A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest.

A breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let-up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again.

8 . Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it to regain a normal rhythm.

In this way, heart attack victims can get help or to a hospital.

9. . Tell as many other people as possible about this. It could save their lives!

10. . A cardiologist says: "If everyone who gets this email & kindly sends it to 10 people, you can bet that we'll save at least one life 

11. Rather than sending jokes, please contribute by forwarding this email which can save a person's life....

 12. If this message comes around to you ..... more than once..... please don't get irritated.... We all need to be happy that we have many friends who care about us and we are being reminded of how to tackle... Heart attacks.... when we are alone.

 

This comes from Dr. Patrick Teefy, Cardiology Head at the Nuclear Medicine Institute University Hospital, London Ont.


Exercise Perscription for Mental Health

Posted on January 23, 2021 at 11:10 AM Comments comments (0)

Loved this article 

BY IGOR KLIBANOV

As a fitness professional, you undoubtedly know how prevalent mental health issues are, and you may even work with people who have them. However, there’s very little specific information on how to make it better (other than “exercise is good for you”) and any improvements that come are simply a side effect of exercise. But what if there was a direct way to exercise specifically for improvement of mental health issues? That’s exactly what we’ll cover in this article.

 

If your clients have noticed that they:

 

Have lost pleasure in activities that they really used to enjoy

Aren’t taking care of themselves as much

Are neglecting certain relationships

Performing worse at their work than they used to

Then this article is for you.

 

We’ll discuss the exercise prescription for mental health issues. I use that word, “prescription” very precisely. After all, when a doctor prescribes a medication, there’s a lot of precision behind it. S/he tells you:

 

The name of the medication

The dose

Whether you should take it with food, or away from food

Whether you should take it in the morning, or the evening

But, when the doctor recommends exercise, well, the recommendation is vague. You don’t know exactly how to do it. You need the exercise prescription for different conditions:

 

The type: cardio, strength training, or stretching

The frequency: how many days per week. It’s not always a “more is better” type of scenario. With some things there’s a “sweet spot”.

The duration: how long you exercise for, or how many sets and reps

The intensity: at what percent of your maximal effort do you exercise?

CARDIO VS. STRENGTH TRAINING

Although the occasional study finds that cardio is more effective, most studies find no difference in effectiveness between cardio and strength training.

 

In one study, researchers divided participants into two groups:

 

Group 1 did cardio, three times per week, for one hour, at an intensity of 80% of their maximal heart rate.

 

Group 2 did strength training, three times per week for one hour. They did 10 exercises, in a circuit format, making sure their heart rate did not rise above 50-60% of their estimated maximum.

 

Group 3 was the control group. They did not exercise.

 

Both groups one and two had similar improvements in mental health (as judged by their depression score). After the study, around 80% of the people in groups one and two no longer met the diagnostic criteria for depression. But only 17% of the people in group three no longer met the diagnostic criteria for depression.

 

In another study, participants with mental health issues, whose average age was 71, participated in high-intensity strength training and, after 10 weeks, those who were in the exercise group had a 54% improvement in their mental health.

 

FREQUENCY

How many days per week is better – one, three, five? Or is it like medications, where if you don’t take it for one day, the effect completely goes away, in which case, you need to take it every day, seven days per week?

 

That’s what this study tried to answer. In here, researchers divided participants into five groups:

 

Group 1: control group (stretching)

Group 2: burned 7 kcal/kg/week, across 3 days

Group 3: burned 7 kcal/kg/week, across 5 days

Group 4: burned 17.5 kcal/kg/week, across 3 days

Group 5: burned 17.5 kcal/kg/week, across 5 days

In this case, there was no difference between the two groups that burned 7 kcal/kg/week, and the group that didn’t exercise at all. None of those three groups saw much of an improvement in mental health. However, both groups that exercised at 17.5 kcal/kg/week saw reductions in symptoms of mental illness that were similar to each other. After 12 weeks of following this program, the reduction in mental illness symptoms was about 47%.

 

From this preliminary evidence, it seems like there’s not much of a difference between three times per week, and five times per week, as long as you cross a certain energy expenditure threshold. Is there a greater effect for even greater calorie expenditures? Maybe. But, as far as I know, that research has not yet been done yet.

 

INTENSITY

So, now that we know the type (cardio and strength training are about even), the frequency (not much of a difference between three and five times per week), what’s the intensity required to reduce mental health issues? Should you take it easy? Or should you really push?

 

That’s what this study tried to find out.

 

Researchers divided participants into three groups:

 

Group 1 was a control group (they didn’t exercise)

 

Group 2 did strength training at 80% of their maximum weight, three times per week for eight weeks.

 

Group 3 did the exact same exercises, repetitions, and frequency as group 2, but they did it with only 20% of their maximum weight.

 

The results:

 

21% of the people in group 1 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks. Without exercise. Without medication. Without psychotherapy. It just happened.

61% of the people in group 2 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks.

28% of the people in group 3 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks

What’s our conclusion? High intensity (over 75% of your maximum) is superior to low intensity when it comes to mental health improvement. This study looked at strength training, but other studies saw the same effect for cardio.

 

DURATION

Is this a case of “more is better”, or is this a case of “just right”? Unfortunately, this variable hasn’t been as well studied as frequency, intensity, and type. However, one preliminary study concluded that duration and intensity are much less important than frequency.

 

In terms of weeks/months, although small, transient reductions are seen with just a single exercise session. To see large, consistent, long-term reductions, you should exercise for at least 9 weeks, according to this study.

 

EXERCISE VS. MEDICATIONS

And now, the million-dollar question: how do medications compare to exercise when it comes to mental health improvement?

 

One meta-analysis (a study of several studies), from the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology looked at this question in very significant detail and found that exercise is equally effective to medications in the treatment of mental health issues. And, when the two are combined, the medications work even better.

 

HOW EXERCISE WORK ON MENTAL HEALTH?

It’s nice to know what works, but “why” does exercise help relieve mental health issues? What are the mechanisms involved?

 

Reason #1: Endorphins

 

When you exercise at a high intensity, it’s physically uncomfortable. You’re out of breath and your muscles are burning. Your body doesn’t like that, so it releases “pain-blocking” chemicals called “endorphins.” It makes sense why the high intensity is required for mental health improvement. It has to be uncomfortable enough to trigger the release of endorphins. Low intensity is too comfortable for endorphin release. It blocks physical pain, but along with that, it helps emotional pain, as is seen in mental illness.

 

Reason #2: Self Efficacy Hypothesis

 

Often, a person who suffers from mental health issues has the feeling like their life is out of control. Things are happening to them and they are helpless against circumstances. Exercise gives you a sense of control. You know that if you go for an intense 20-minute workout, you’ll feel better. And who controls when you work out? You do! Who controls how long you work out? You do! Who controls how hard you work out? You do!

 

Reason #3: Distraction

 

Sometimes exercise just works because you’re focused on how hard you’re breathing and how much your muscles are burning. You are able to forget whatever is stressing you out.

 

Reason #4: Sleep Improvement

 

It’s very well-known that people who exercise usually sleep better. People who sleep better have better moods.

 

Reason #5: Serotonin

 

Serotonin is the “happy chemical” and when it’s released you feel content and relaxed. Exercise helps increase serotonin in the brain.

 

ABOUT IGOR KLIBANOV

Igor Klibanov is the author of five books on fitness and nutrition, including The Mental Health Prescription, as well as the CEO of one of Toronto’s premier personal training companies, Fitness Solutions Plus. He was selected as one of the top five personal trainers in Toronto by the Metro News newspaper, and has performed approximately 400 speaking engagements, many of which have been to some of Canada’s largest corporations (including RBC, IBM, Intact Insurance, and others).

 

Additionally, he has multiple programs for personal trainers to enhance their skills and is a regular speaker at various personal training conferences.

https://www.canfitpro.com/2020/10/19/exercise-prescription-for-mental-health/

Unlock Ypur Hips Flexors

Posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Unocking your hip flexors and why it is so important:

 

The "Hidden Survival Muscle" In Your Body Missed By

Modern Physicians That Keep Millions Of Men And Women

Defeated By Pain, Frustrated With Belly Fat, And Struggling

To Feel Energized Every Day…

 

… because it's tight hip flexors.

 

 

 

You see, our hip flexors are the engine through which our body moves. They control balance, our ability to sit, stand, twist, reach, bend, walk and step.

Everything goes through the hips.

And when our hip flexors tighten it causes a lot of problems in ordinarily healthy and active people, like us.

Before I reveal how most people end up having tight hip flexors yet never realize it, let me introduce myself.

My name is Mike Westerdal and I'm a national best-selling fitness author, sports nutrition specialist, personal trainer, Iron Man magazine contributor and founder of the internet's longest-standing strength site, CriticalBench.com.

In a moment, I'll reveal to you the 10 Key Moves you need to loosen your hip flexors and unlock the hidden power in your body.

But first, let me explain just how deep-rooted the problem is.

 

 

https://www.unlockmyhips.com/?hop=mm3584" target="_blank">https://www.unlockmyhips.com/?hop=mm3584

I thank the author Rick Weslerdal CPT CHECK THIS OUT

National Coalition of Fitness Clubs Taking Extraordinary Measures to Support COVID-Weary Members and Fitness Professionals

Posted on November 1, 2020 at 3:25 PM Comments comments (0)

National Coalition of Fitness Clubs Taking Extraordinary Measures to Support COVID-Weary Members and Fitness Professionals

Safety, and mental and physical health are top priorities;

$4-billion industry under intense economic pressure, at risk without adequate government support;

"Canadians are in real danger of losing many of their neighborhood gyms and boutique studios"

EDMONTON, AB, Oct. 20, 2020 /CNW/ - Keeping everyone in Canada as safe as possible and focused on their physical and mental health during an unprecedented pandemic is the guiding priority of more than 6,000 fitness clubs, gyms, and studios from coast-to-coast.

 

 

 

Fitness Industry Council of Canada (FIC) has committed to meeting or exceeding government and health authority guidelines that have been proven to be effective at minimizing risk and virus transmission. FIC has also committed to working collaboratively with health and government officials to develop guidelines and regulations that prioritize health and safety.

"We know the positive impact exercise has on the physical, psychological, and social health of people, and are committed to providing safe solutions," said Scott Wildeman, President, FIC. "We want to work as an active partner with government and healthcare officials and help them make evidence-based decisions to protect our members and employees — and keep our doors open."

"We're welcoming back increasing numbers of people in our gyms and studios, but we also desperately need government support to ensure we remain sustainable in this new normal of restrictions and shutdowns."

Canadian fitness facilities generate nearly $4 billion in revenue annually and employ tens of thousands of people. FIC represents all levels of facilities, from the largest chains – GoodLife Fitness, Orangetheory Fitness, MOVATI Athletic, Énergie Cardio, GYMVMT, Trevor Linden Club 16, etc. – to the thousands of smaller, independent studios and gyms that are also struggling to survive amid capacity restrictions, rolling closures and threats of future shutdowns.

"As a small business owner, the shutdown in the spring stretched finances about as far as they could possibly go," said Jeff Ardron, President and GM of Fitness Unlimited Athletic Club in Maple Ridge, B.C. "We were able to reopen, but not all gyms and studios were as lucky. We have received a lot of support from our members, but if another closure were to happen, I'm not sure what the outcome would be."

"Most fitness facilities are operating at approximately 60 per cent of the pre-pandemic revenues," said Wildeman. "At the same time, they've made significant investments in additional personal protective equipment, cleaning and sanitizing equipment, staff training, in addition to other measures to protect their employees and members. Canadians are in real danger of losing many of their neighborhood gyms and boutique studios."

 

 

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/national-coalition-of-fitness-clubs-taking-extraordinary-measures-to-support-covid-weary-members-and-fitness-professionals-836410899.html" target="_blank">click on link for more information: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/national-coalition-of-fitness-clubs-taking-extraordinary-measures-to-support-covid-weary-members-and-fitness-professionals-836410899.html

 

Returning to Campus - What to do

Posted on August 11, 2020 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Returning to Campus - What to do

Thunder Bay

 

In the coming weeks and months, more students, faculty, and staff will gradually begin returning to our campuses. As such, and in light of recent announcements from provincial and federal health authorities, new health and safety measures are being implemented to safeguard our University community.

 

While all Lakehead University employees are still to follow the current guidance that indicates if you can work from home you should, below are the measures all faculty and staff must follow if they intend to return to working on our campuses from time-to-time, temporarily, part-time, or full-time.

 

When you do return to campus, you'll notice that new signage has been put up in many areas to help inform you of some of the changes to our campuses, including new health and safety regulations, the direction to be followed in certain spaces such as stairwells, and other appropriate precautions in keeping with public health authorities' guidelines.

 

The information on this page is to be considered part of a living document - to be updated, as required, in keeping with provincial, federal, and public health announcements, regulations and guidelines.

 

Mandatory Reintegration Training

 

A critical component of a safe return to campus is a shared understanding of proper measures to protect the health and safety of everyone. To this end, staff returning to campus are expected to complete a brief course focused on an overview of COVID-19, health and safety guidelines, and infection control measures.

 

Masking

 

Wearing a mask contributes greatly to the reduction of the spread of COVID-19 (in addition to frequent hand washing and physical distancing). Once you have completed your reintegration training and are ready to return to campus, be advised that masks are now to be worn in all indoor public spaces where physical distancing may not be possible.

 

A mask, or face covering, is understood to be a medical or non-medical mask or similar, partial facial covering such as folded handkerchiefs/bandanas, scarves, and other materials that could serve to cover one's nose, mouth and chin - thereby establishing a barrier to limit the potential spread of respiratory droplets.

 

Visit the Health Canada information page to learn about non-medical masks and face-coverings, including their appropriate use and limitations.

 

Exemptions to masking

 

Where physical/social distancing is certain, here are circumstances when masks or face coverings may be removed in an indoor space on our campuses:

 

If you are working in a private office, or alone in a room. However, a mask should be worn while walking through buildings to and from such private spaces as you never know when you might suddenly come into contact with others.

In classroom/class settings, instructors may use their judgement when deciding if masks/face coverings will be required while considering everyone's comfort level, the tasks to be performed, and the need to maintain physical distancing.

In office spaces, supervisors may use their judgement when deciding if masks/face coverings will be required while considering everyone's comfort level, tasks, and the need to maintain physical distancing.

Lakehead University also follows the Thunder Bay and Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Units' acknowledgement that masking may not be appropriate or possible for everyone. The following are exemptions defined by these District Health Units:

 

Children under the age of 2 years old, or children under the age of 5 years either chronologically or developmentally who refuse to wear a mask and cannot be persuaded to do so by their caregiver;

Individuals with medical conditions rendering them unable to safely wear a mask, including breathing difficulties, cognitive difficulties, hearing or communication difficulties;

Individuals who cannot wear or are unable to apply or remove a mask without assistance, including those who are accommodated under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, or who have protections under the Ontario Human Rights Code (R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19), as amended;

Any person who is employed by or is an agent of the Operator of an Enclosed Public Space and is within or behind a physical barrier (e.g. Plexiglass).

Anyone who is unable to remove the mask without help;

Anyone wearing a face covering that would inhibit the ability to breathe in any way such as, but not limited to, during moderate to intense physical activity (such as running) or activity that would preclude its use (such as swimming); and

Individuals who cannot wear face coverings for any religious reasons.

Where to get masks

 

While students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to obtain their own masks or face coverings, Lakehead University has ordered masks to be given to employees returning to campus. Watch for a Bulletin notice informing everyone how to get your Lakehead mask.

 

While on campus

 

When you return to our campuses to work, Lakehead University and public health guidelines maintain that masking, physical distancing, thorough and frequent hand-washing, and disinfecting your private work offices/spaces is the best way to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Please do your part to help protect others.

 

Approved disinfectants are available for purchase through Physical Plant.

 

Hand sanitizer, wipes and disposable masks are available for purchase through the bookstore.

 

Classrooms

 

As some courses will be delivered within classrooms as part of hybrid class delivery models, measures are being taken to ensure that such spaces are scheduled appropriately and cleaned between uses. The number of people a classroom or similar space may accommodate will be limited so as to adhere to physical distancing rules.

 

Enforcement of Health and Safety Measures

 

On July 13 and 24, 2020, respectively, the Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Unit and the Thunder Bay District Health Unit announced that non-medical masks or face coverings must be worn when entering an enclosed public space. These regulations apply to all employees and members of the public and are issued under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act.

 

Procedures to address violations of social distancing, masking, and other health and safety measures on Lakehead properties are the responsibility of the University and will be enforced through existing codes that protect members of our University community.

 

Lakehead University's COVID-19 Transition Committee and its Working Groups

 

Click here to learn more about what Lakehead University's COVID-19 Transition Committee and its Working Groups are doing to help prepare our campuses for our next phase of operations.

 

Notice from the Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic) - PTR Information Session

Thunder Bay

 

There will be an Information Session held on Promotion, Tenure and Renewal (PTR) process and procedures.

 

Please note the following date, time and connection information:

 

Tuesday, Aug. 18 from 1 to 2:30 pm via Zoom

https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/j/92090352794?pwd=d1ZmMGZ4V0x6YU5BU2hiRWg3ejdk...

Password: 98765

Faculty members who are considering making application for promotion, tenure or renewal or who are interested in knowing more about the PTR process are encouraged to attend.

 

Request your Online Site for the Upcoming Academic Sessions

Thunder Bay

 

Instructors are reminded to submit their requests for an online mycourselink (D2L) course site for the upcoming academic sessions.

 

Click the Request an Online Course Site button located at the top of your class roster in myInfo, and you'll receive an email to your Lakehead University email account confirming the successful set-up of your online course site.

 

For more information, please contact the Teaching Commons at mycourselink@lakeheadu.ca.

 

PLEASE NOTE: A new site request will need to be made each time a course is offered. Content can be migrated from a previously used site to the new one by selecting the Migrate Course option on the Request Form.

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

Posted on August 1, 2020 at 12:45 AM Comments comments (1)

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

Thank you to                                     By Paige Smith • Nov 14, 2019

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

You’re halfway through a three-mile run, intense pilates class, or round of your weight circuit when — suddenly — you’re feeling nauseous.

 

Despite your best intentions to push on with your workout, you’re forced to stop, sit down, and struggle just to take steady breaths. Within moments, your body feels zapped of energy. What little strength you have left is used to fight back a gag reflex.

 

Sound familiar?

 

Exercise-induced nausea is a common phenomenon, one that most people — fitness experts and novices alike — have experienced at some point.

 

For more tips about how to maximize your workout sign up for Openfit for free today.

 

 

Kyrin Dunston, MD says vomiting during or after exercise usually has to do with one or more of the following factors:

 

hydration (too little or too much)

nutrition (whether or not you’ve eaten, and what you ate)

workout intensity vs. baseline fitness level

specific exercise

anxiety

gastrointestinal dysfunction

a serious medical condition

The cause of your exercise-induced nausea may not be evident at first, but one thing’s for sure: throwing up when you’re trying to work up a sweat is zero fun. Not only does it derail your workout, but it also makes it difficult to feel motivated and excited to continue challenging your body.

 

The good news? That turbulent feeling in your stomach is avoidable if you take the proper precautions.

 

 

nauseous after workout- drink water

 

1. Eat and Hydrate Properly

To prevent nausea, be smart about when and how you fuel your body before a workout. Kristin McGee, an ACE-certified personal trainer based in New York City, recommends giving yourself at least an hour to digest a meal before you start moving. Keep pre-workout meals light, and be sure to include both proteins and carbs if you can. If you’re hungry and can’t wait an hour to work out, opt for a banana, handful of raisins, or an energy gel, all of which can be digested quickly.

 

As for fluids, make sure you’re hydrated, but don’t overdo it. There’s no need to chug all the water in your 24-ounce bottle 10 minutes before you start your run — an eight-ounce glass or two will do the trick.

 

And though sports drinks can help replenish lost minerals, the high sugar content of many of them can subvert your hydration efforts. Replace these sugary beverages with Openfit Fuel, our energizing pre-workout supplement, which contains no added sugars.

 

Dunston says it’s important to consume sports drinks in accordance with the duration and intensity level of your workout. Good old-fashioned H20 is sufficient under most circumstances, but for those seeking an edge during particularly tough or long workouts, try a low-sugar sports drink that maximizes fluid absorption and replenishes lost electrolytes.

 

Possible Cause: Too much or too little food and water

Dunston says dehydration — when your body doesn’t have enough water to function optimally — is a significant cause of exercise-induced nausea. The other possibility? You guzzled too much H2O, and your stomach is overly full.

 

“How recently you have eaten and what you ate before your workout can be issues as well,” says Dunston. “Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is particularly a problem if you work out in the morning and don’t eat anything beforehand.” If that’s the case, Dunston says you’ll usually experience both nausea and dizziness.

 

Overeating before exercise also pits your stomach against your muscles. Dunston says the body moves blood to the gastrointestinal system to help with digestion, but if you exercise on a full stomach, your body also has to send blood to your muscles to support their movements. When your body tries to handle both digestion and strenuous exercise simultaneously, there isn’t enough blood flow to assist with digestion, Dunston says. Nausea can result.

 

“Nausea is a precursor to vomiting,” says Dunston. “Dumping out the food in the stomach is one way the body can alleviate the blood supply problem.”

 

 

nauseous after workout- take it easy

 

2. Take it easy

If you haven’t prepared your body for a specific type of exercise or intensity (like running five miles at a seven-minute pace, or swimming laps non-stop for 30 minutes), don’t go at it full force. When you’re not used to a certain speed, distance, or movement, it’s essential to ease into it and adjust your expectations accordingly.

 

“Keep the intensity level within your tolerated range,” says Dunston. In other words, don’t assume you can handle a hilly six-mile trail run if you’ve only ever jogged on the comparatively flat streets of your neighborhood.

 

Make an effort to approach new workouts and movements with equal parts enthusiasm and caution. When you do feel ready to increase your pace, distance, or reps, do it gradually, and be sure to notice when your body starts to feel overworked so you can back off before you hit your breaking point.

 

Possible Cause: Overexertion

The line between pushing yourself to run two more minutes and pushing yourself to the point of nausea can be blurry. Exercise isn’t supposed to be easy (it’s meant to challenge you, after all), but it shouldn’t make you so sick that you can’t complete a workout.

 

McGee says overexertion can lead to nausea.

 

“If you’re exercising at an intense level or pushing yourself past your threshold, your body reacts by increasing blood flow to your muscles, heart, lungs, and brain so your body can process energy and continue working out,” she says. “When this happens, blood is diverted away from your stomach and that can make you feel sick.”

 

 

nauseous after workout- warm up

 

3. Warm-Up Properly and Avoid Exercising in Extreme Conditions

If you go from sitting at your desk to running at full speed without a sufficient transition period, you’re going to overexert yourself before you even get into your workout.

 

To prevent nausea by overexertion, McGee says it’s crucial to warm up your muscles before you start working them. Depending on your workout, you can jog lightly for five to 10 minutes, walk briskly for a few minutes, or do some dynamic stretching to boost blood flow, activate your central nervous system, and optimize strength, power, and range of motion.

 

Another tip? Avoid working out in extreme conditions, says McGee. Exercising in overly humid or hot environments can lead to heat exhaustion, nausea, and dizziness if you’re not careful.

 

If you love hot yoga or outdoor runs in the summer, don’t stress — stay adequately hydrated and start slow to give your body time to adjust to the high temperature.

 

 

Other Possible Causes of Nausea While Exercising

1. Disorienting movements

“Specific exercises, particularly those that contract the abdominal wall muscles and those that require head twisting can induce nausea as well,” Dunston says.

 

Moves like crunches apply extra pressure to the stomach, says Dunston, while twisting motions can cause the inner-ear vestibular system — the network of sensory components in charge of our sense of balance — to become disoriented.

 

Anyone who’s ever closed their eyes during sit-ups or tried to do camel pose at the end of a yoga class knows what happens when your body feels off balance: you get nauseous.

 

2. Performance anxiety

If you’re involved in a competitive event in which there’s enormous pressure to succeed — like a race, sporting match, or weightlifting competition — you might experience occasional or constant performance anxiety, which can cause you to feel overly nervous and nauseous.

 

You don’t have to take the starting line of a 10K or Tough Mudder to feel anxious, though. Dunston says any exercise under pressure can cause serious nerves. “It could be as simple as being in a new [workout] class where you are concerned with keeping up and looking good,” says Dunston.

 

3. Larger health concerns

Dunston says exercise can sometimes exacerbate the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders and other health conditions, causing nausea and other problems.

 

“If the nausea persists despite addressing all of the above concerns, it’s best to see a doctor to be evaluated for underlying potential health issues that need to be addressed,” says Dunston.

 

 

What to Do if Your Workout Makes You Nauseous

Even when you think you’ve done everything right, sometimes nausea just happens. When that horrible, sick-to-your-stomach sensation starts to creep up on you, Dunston says it’s best to rest for a few minutes. Stop what you’re doing and find a something sturdy to sit or lean against.

 

If the nausea doesn’t subside, “it might be best to call it quits for the day or lower the intensity of the activity,” says Dunston.

https://www.openfit.com/avoid-throwing-up-after-exercise#:~:text=Possible%20Cause%3A%20Too%20much%20or,your%20stomach%20is%20overly%20full.


I am sharing this because met a young lady yesterday that gets nauseous every class she does says she likes feeling.

For a healthier workout recognizing this is important next step is to learn how to learn to stop.

Have a healthy day.  Anne 

Phase 3 COVID-19 opening

Posted on July 31, 2020 at 11:25 AM Comments comments (0)

For all out there Teaching Fitness classes & personal Training.

The Canada is Phase 3 of getting back to our new normal, please familiarize yourself with what those guidelines look like for your specific area. The information isn’t always easy to find – but for running your courses and exams it is important to know for your business.

The number one priority is the health and safety of you and your participants!

Be mindful of:

  • the groups you teach age & wellness
  • the programs you were offering before will they work in this new social distancing?
be Safe stay healthy


Is It Better to Sleep In or Work Out?

Posted on July 29, 2020 at 11:05 AM Comments comments (6)

Staying healthy is so easy, right? Log eight hours of sleep, work out for an hour a day at least five days a week, and steer clear of processed foods. Also drink enough water, meal prep, and meditate. Trying to fit it all in, on top of all the other variables in your life (kids! work! relationships!), can seem impossible. So when you're debating the choice of lying in bed for another two hours or schlepping to the gym, sometimes shuteye wins. We get it: working out on no sleep can be a real drag.

 

But is that such a bad thing? After all, some mornings you just don't feel well, or maybe you overdid it yesterday. Is it ever worth it to sleep in and skip the gym? Turns out, science still doesn't have the hard and fast answer (yet).

 

"Both sleep and exercise are main behaviors that contribute to physical and mental health," says Kelly Glazer Baron, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and an associate professor at the University of Utah. Her research has found that clocking at least seven hours of sleep can actually help you work out longer and harder the next day. And the exercise/sleep equation goes both ways—people with insomnia who started a regular aerobic exercise program improved the quality of their sleep and felt less tired during the day, another study from Northwestern University found. So working out on no sleep can actually help with the whole “no sleep” thing! (Even more proof: Why Sleep Is the #1 Most Important Thing For a Better Body)

 

Considering multiple studies point to the direct relationship between sleep and exercise, there's no denying that you should strive for adequate amounts of both, adds Shannon Fable, director of exercise programming at national gym chain Anytime Fitness. "If that's impossible, try to only sacrifice your sleep two to three days during the week in order to hit the early morning cycling class. Get some extra sleep the other days and on the weekends."

 

That said, there are still a few hard and fast rules you can follow to determine what to do on those tough days when your bed feels oh-so-comfy.

 

Sleep or Sweat?

If you got seven to eight hours of sleep the night before... You're good to hit the gym, says Fable. Seven to nine hours of sleep is what most adults need, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

 

If you've been sleeping less than six hours most nights that week... It's time to rethink your schedule, recommends Baron. See where you can cut corners to be more efficient: Head to bed 15 minutes earlier or shave 10 minutes off your morning routine to get a bit more sleep. If you're not a morning person, consider a lunch break or an after-work gym time. (Try this insanely effective 15-minute workout when you're crunched for time.)

 

If you were up all night... Definitely skip the a.m. sweat sesh, Fable says. (And maybe stock up on these possible insomnia cures.) Not only do you need the sleep, but your coordination will be affected, making exercise potentially more dangerous. Your ratings of perceived exertion will also make exercise feel harder than it is, she warns. Even if you're working out at the same intensity as you usually do, sleep deprivation can mess with your mental performance, according to research in the journal Sports Medicine. Moderation is key when working out on no sleep or when tired. Exercising too hard can make you more tired and increase your risk of injury, because fatigue can hamper concentration and form. "When you're feeling sleepy, back off a little from your workout status quo; reduce the intensity and duration of your exercise," says Shawn Youngstedt, Ph.D., a professor in the College of Health Solutions at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

 

If you've only worked out once that week (and it's Friday)... If you're aiming for three to four workouts per week, it's time to move, says Baron. Just 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise three times per week can lower your risk for heart attack and stroke, says the American Heart Association. So don't hit snooze!

 

If you've been consistently killing it at the gym that week... Skip your workout, advises Fable. Everyone deserves a day off and your body needs sleep to repair after heavy workouts. Rest days allow for protein synthesis, which is crucial for building muscle, according to a study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

 

If you're sore... Sleep in and take a day off. Overtraining can cause a decrease in sleep quality and duration, Baron says.

 

If You're Feeling Beat...Eat for All-Day Energy

After a rough night, whether you’re working out on no sleep or heading straight to work, skip the energy-drink IV in favor of revitalizing nutrients. "It's amazing how eating the right foods can help you make it through the day," says Lauren Antonucci, R.D., the director of Nutrition Energy, a private nutrition-counseling service in New York City. (See more about how to eat for better sleep.)

 

Antonucci’s meal plan will keep you revved—and full—until dinner.

 

When you wake up: Dehydration compounds fatigue, so down two glasses of water first thing. Aim to sip half your body weight in fluid ounces by bedtime (for a 145-pound woman, that's 72 1/2 ounces, or about nine cups).

Breakfast: Go for eggs, scrambled or hard-boiled. "They're one of the most absorbable types of protein, with just the right amount of fats and a dose of energy-boosting B vitamins," Antonucci says. For staying power, add healthy carbs, like a slice of whole-grain toast and some fruit. A hit of caffeine will kick-start your day; if java makes you jittery, grab a mug of green tea. It has some caffeine, plus a compound called epigallocatechin, which, studies show, produces a relaxed and attentive state.

Midmorning: Improve your focus with a handful of mixed nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, and peanuts. The protein provides a jolt of energy, while the combo of filling fiber and omega-3 fatty acids tides you over until lunch.

Lunch: Build your meal out of lean protein, slow-burning complex carbs, and healthy fats—try a skinless chicken breast with a broccoli, black bean, and quinoa salad—to power through the next few hours.

Late afternoon: Chips or chocolate chip cookies may sound awfully good right about now, but after causing a quick spike in your energy level, they will send it crashing. For a steady, long-lasting pick-me-up, choose nutrient-rich high-fiber snacks like hummus with a whole-grain pita or baby carrots.

picture-415-1448986766

By Sara Angle

https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/it-better-sleep-or-work-out?utm_medium=browser&utm_source=shape.com&utm_content=20200729&utm_campaign=618054" target="_blank">https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/it-better-sleep-or-work-out?utm_medium=browser&utm_source=shape.com&utm_content=20200729&utm_campaign=618054

@saraangle22

5 Possible Reasons for Why You're Crying

Posted on July 27, 2020 at 1:15 PM Comments comments (0)

That touching episode of Queer Eye, the first dance at a wedding, or that heartbreaking animal welfare commercial—you know the one. These are all perfectly logical reasons to cry. But if you've ever just been sitting in traffic waiting for a light to turn green and suddenly started weeping, well that can be jarring. You've likely wondered "why am I crying for no reason?” (or what surely feels like no reason).

 

Frequent crying spells can be short bursts of spontaneous, out-of-nowhere (sometimes anxiety-provoked) tears that tend to strike when you're just going about your life. Yet they likely leave you fairly confused, asking yourself “why do I feel like crying?” or “why am I ~really~ crying, actually right now?”

 

First of all, you probably aren't pregnant, and no, there's nothing wrong with you.

 

"Crying spells can have a physical cause, but they also indicate that you're built up a lot of subconscious emotions you aren't processing," explains Yvonne Thomas, Ph.D., a Los Angeles–based psychologist specializing in relationships and self-esteem.

 

If you find yourself in a crying spell for no apparent reason fairly often, this list can help you decode the potential health reason behind it. Just know that this is not an exhaustive list by any means, and seeking help from a loved one, confidant, therapist, or doctor is encouraged to deal with your individual triggers, emotions, or possible underlying issues. (More: 19 Weird Things That Can Make You Cry)

 

5 Possible Reasons for Why You're Crying

1. Hormones

The days leading up to your period can cause a rollercoaster of emotions. As levels of estrogen and progesterone swing up and down, brain chemicals responsible for mood are affected, and that can trigger irritability, moodiness, and yep, crying spells. If you're already stressed out or anxious, PMS can magnify those feelings and make your crying episodes even worse, says Thomas. You can wait it out—PMS symptoms clear up as your cycle moves on—or if the crying spells are cutting into your quality of life, ask your doctor to screen you for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a more severe form of PMS that impacts about 5 percent of pre-menopausal women, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health.

 

Getting enough sleep, taking it easy on the alcohol and caffeine, and integrating more self-care might help make PMS more bearable so you won’t have quite so many, “why do I feel like crying?!” moments. Also worth noting: No matter what time of the month it is, having female hormones means you're more likely to deal with crying spells, period. Testosterone (a hormone normally found in higher levels in males) tends to tame tears, while prolactin (generally in larger supply in women) may trigger them.

 

2. Depression

Crying spells caused by sadness—kind of a no-brainer, right? However, when sad feelings linger for weeks or months, that may signal a deeper kind of dispair seen with clinical depression. Depression often comes with many other symptoms such as severe fatigue, lack of enjoyment from things you used to like, and sometimes physical aches and pains too.

 

"Many women display depression as frustration, anger, or irritability," says Thomas. "Each of these emotions can result in tearfulness, so if you experience them, see your doctor for a depression screening, even if you don't necessarily feel down."

 

3. Extreme stress

Okay, we all get stressed (and 2020 has been no walk in the park), but if you aren't facing these work and life pressures head-on, and instead, sweeping tension under the rug, it's no surprise you're suddenly streaming tears, says Thomas. "Set aside some time and really ask yourself what might be stressing you out so much, and form a plan to tackle it head-on," says Thomas. Though being stressed itself isn't a formal medical condition, it certainly can be an answer to why you may be crying. Excessive stress can make physical symptoms worse or even trigger them in the first place; everything from digestive distress to heart disease.

 

Give yourself some grace if this is why you're crying—doing so while stressed can actually be a *good* thing. A study published in the journal Emotions found that getting teary while stressed can be a mode of self-soothing, helping you calm down and regulate your heart rate. (Related: The One Thing You Can Do to Be Kinder to Yourself Right Now)

 

4. Anxiety

Find yourself in panic mode a lot of the time, with a racing heart, butterflies in your stomach, and extreme self-consciousness that limits your participation in everyday life? This might be the reason for your crying spells. "Anxiety disorders are not uncommon among women, and all the emotion they cause can result in frequent explosions of tears, even when you're not feeling panicky," says Thomas. Medication and/or cognitive therapy may help, so it pays to ask your doctor for help if you think your crying spells might be linked to an underlying anxiety disorder. (Related: What Happened When I Tried CBD for My Anxiety)

 

5. Fatigue

Newborns cry when they’re sleepy, so it stands to reason that fully-grown humans might do the same sometimes. Crying spells, irritability, and sadness were all linked to sleep deprivation (in the 4- to 5 hour-a-night range) in research published in the journal Sleep.

 

Plus, anxiety and stress can increase feelings of exhaustion (when your brain or emotions are in overdrive, no wonder), but you can also just be tuckered out by a night or two of sub-par sleep.

 

Each person’s sleep needs vary, but start by bumping up your bedtime by 15 minutes each night until you can allocate enough time for seven or eight hours most nights, the amount recommended by the National Sleep Foundation for adequate R & R. And if you’re struggling to get to sleep, try adding these foods for better sleep to your pantry.

 

If you or someone you know needs help, please call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline or text 741741, or chat online at suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

 

By Esther Crain

Find article https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/4-reasons-youre-crying?utm_medium=browser&utm_source=shape.com&utm_content=20200727&utm_campaign=615796" target="_blank">https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/4-reasons-youre-crying?utm_medium=browser&utm_source=shape.com&utm_content=20200727&utm_campaign=615796

This can be very stressful these days, always think this will pass, enjoy each minute of the day, don't sweat the small stuff, take some long deep breaths and move forward to positive thinking.  Enjoy a nap when you can.


 

8 Exercises for Sciatica and Lower Back Pain Relieve

Posted on July 8, 2020 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (1)

https://www.gymguider.com/8-exercises-relieve-sciatica-pain/" target="_blank">8 Exercises for Sciatica and Lower Back Pain Relieve

If you suddenly start feeling unexplainable pain in your buttock, lower back or thigh, chances are that your sciatic nerve is not doing quite well. The sciatic nerve is the largest single nerve in the human body that plays the crucial role of connecting the spinal cord with the leg and foot muscles. Unfortunately, every person alive has about 40% chance of experiencing some form of sciatic pain at some point in their lives. While it might not be a chronic condition for most people, even infrequent sciatic pain can be frustrating and devitalizing – it can feel like a bad leg cramp or like an electrical tingling, it can appear anytime you get up or even sneeze, and it can last for weeks.

 

While over-the-counter medications can offer some relief from the pain, they rarely address the underlying inflammation that’s the real root of the problem. Luckily, there are other, highly effective and drug-free sciatica treatments that can provide a long-term relief alongside with some extra health benefits. Read the rest of this article to learn more!

What causes sciatica?

Sciatic pain, or sciatica, is most commonly caused by compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve that runs from each side of the lower lumbar and lumbosacral spine through the buttock and all the way down to the foot and in most cases, it’s the piriformis muscle (a small hip rotator muscle located in the buttock region) that irritates the nearby sciatic nerve, thereby causing pain and numbness. That being said, the nerve roots that exit the spine to form the sciatic nerve are very sensitive and can easily be irritated and a variety of back problems can also contribute to sciatic pain, including preexisting lumbar spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease and/or spondylolisthesis. The pain can be made even worse if you’re overweight and physically inactive, or if you regularly wear high heels.

 

Symptoms

The specific symptoms of a troubled sciatic nerve can be different depending on how much the spinal nerve is compressed. They come in a great variety, ranging from nerve pain, numbness, electric tingling to reduced reflexes in your Achilles tendon and knee and fatigue, weakness or loss of feeling in your legs or feet. The symptoms most people experience are primarily felt in the buttock or in the back of the thigh, but they can also affect the calf, lower back and toes. For some people, sciatic pain can be severe, chronic and debilitating, while for others it might be infrequent and less intimidating, but with the potential to get worse. Therefore, addressing it on time and with adequate methods is a must for anyone looking to maintain optimal health.

 

In cases where the cause of sciatica is lumbar disc herniation, surgery is the most common approach. The procedure involves removing the portion of the herniated disc that is pinching the nerve. Fortunately, up to 90% of people recover from sciatica without surgery.

Exercises for reducing sciatic pain

You don’t have to use medications to treat your sciatica – they offer only short-term effects and never really fix the issue (with the rare exception of some hardcore anti-inflammatory drugs, perhaps). If you’d rather solve the problem on a more natural and more effective way, exercise is a fantastic way to both improve your overall health and get rid of your sciatica nightmare once and for all. However, if it’s too strenuous or intense, your problems could only get worse and therefore, we recommend taking it easy and creating a stretching routine with simple exercise that will actually do wonders for your back, buttock and leg muscles. Here are the best exercise stretches for strengthening your back, improving your posture and preventing or eliminating sciatic pain:


 

 

#1. The standing back twist

This exercise is great for people who are less then optimally flexible and have little experience with more advanced exercises. Place your left foot up on a chair, place your right hand on your raised knee and have your left hand rest on your hip. Turn your entire upper body to the left side as far as you can without causing pain, but keep your hips facing forward. Hold the final position for 30 seconds, then release and repeat on the other side.

 

#2. The knee raise

Lie on your back and draw one knee to the chest while keeping the other leg straight and resting on the floor. Press it against your chest, pushing it as far down as you can, and hold the position for 30 seconds. Make sure that your shoulders are firmly planted on the floor.

#3. The two-knee twist

Lie on your back, extend your arms to both sides, forming the letter “T” and bend both knees together. Keeping your shoulders on the floor, turn both of your knees out to one side and hold the position for one minute, then repeat on the other side.

#4. The single leg twist

Lie on your back with extended arms and bend the left knee to a 90 degree angle, while keeping the other leg straight. Place your right hand on the bent knee and turn your upper body to face the left arm and hold the position for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

#5. The twisted lunge

Take a step forward with your left leg and bend the knee, keeping the other leg out behind you. Your feet should be about one leg’s length apart. Twist your back to place your right elbow on the outside of the bent knee and hold for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

#6. The seated twist


Sit on the floor with your legs extended straight in front of you. Bend your knees and put your feet on the floor, then slide your left foot under the right leg to the outside of your right hip, bent at the knee, and lay the outside of the left leg on the floor. If this feels too uncomfortable, just keep your left leg extended in front of you. Then, bring your right foot over the left leg and place it on the floor just outside of your left hip (the knee should point directly up at the ceiling). Put your right hand on the floor behind you, twist the torso toward the inside of your right thigh and set your left upper arm on the outside of your right thigh, near the knee. Hold the final position for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

#7. The cat exercise

Get on all fours, bend your back down as much as you can and lift your chest by pulling the shoulders back. Hold for 10 seconds while breathing slow and deep. Return to a flat back, then perform an opposite movement by raising your back as much as you can and tucking your chin into your chest. Hold for 10 seconds, then release and repeat.

 

#8. The child’s exercise


End your routine with this easy exercise that will relieve all stress that has accumulated in your back. Get down on all fours then move your body backward toward your heels and sit on them, keeping the upper body resting on the floor and your arms extended in front of you. Take a moment to really relax the entire body and hold the position for as long as necessary.

Shared from GymGuider.com

https://www.gymguider.com/8-exercises-relieve-sciatica-pain/" target="_blank">https://www.gymguider.com/8-exercises-relieve-sciatica-pain/

canfitpro FIS Thunder Bay Connect

Posted on July 7, 2020 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Hope everyone is well during these changing time in our lives.

 

If you are like me it has been challenging with my brain turning off and on, staying home a lot with a lot of distancing, gardening, sewing and LEARNING. Forgot cleaning lots.

Wondering how I will continue my Professional business, look after all my participants and being a resource for all of you.

 

Please note: if you do not want to be on this list please email back Unsubscribe thank you. - in subject line

 

I've been talking to some of you by email, by phone and descided to invite you all to

canfitpro FIS Connect Thunder Bay


This will be 1 hour by zoom see invitation and link below.

 

I would love to touching base with all interested certified Fitness Instructor Specialist's.


 

Topics to cover and share:

1/ Now that life has changed what does your Professional fitness classes look like?

 

2/ Have you been teaching online? Are you stuck wondering where and how to begin?

 

3/ How to make sure you are legal with insurance, music, platforms you may be using (share & Learn).

 

4/ What resources are out there for you?

 

What does a Virtual class look like that sets you apart for all that is online?

What will a live class look like, social distancing, cleaning hands and equipment?

 

Let’s do some brain storming, share IDEAS. Will you be teaching online classes or virtual classes, indoors, outdoors?

Have you registered for the canfitpro August Convention or thinking about it/

https://www.canfitpro.com/convention-2020/

 

Q & A, concerns, visions for your future.

 

This will be one hour goes by real fast so will touch base of specific topics.

If you can't make want to attend let me know I can set up another time for those unable at this time.

Give me your best times and days.

 

You are invited to a Zoom meeting.

When: Jul 10, 2020 10:00 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

 

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYlcOyurzgrHdLUB9hH1ajDTVuFWHWnXN1L" target="_blank">https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYlcOyurzgrHdLUB9hH1ajDTVuFWHWnXN1L

 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

 

My email confirmation will come from aparr@lakeheadu.ca

Feel free to call me anytime I'm here more than not. Thanks

 

Have a wonderful HOT afternoon.

 

Anne

Should Clients Wear Masks While Exercising?

Posted on July 2, 2020 at 3:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Should Clients Wear Masks While Exercising?

 

Many governors across the country have mandated masks to be worn in all indoor, public locations to help stop the spread of Covid-19. That leads many of us to ask whether or not there are any safety risks associated with exercising with a mask on.

 

As fitness professionals we should have a response ready when our clients ask this question, but what should we tell them?

 

Since many academic institutions are currently closed, large scale experiments are not feasible to effectively test usage of various types of masks during exercise and how it affects the user. It is also very difficult to effectively test and examine the spread of Covid-19 in the current conditions and control for all variables. As a result, the information and guidelines being released seem to change daily as we learn more about the virus. Try to be patient (and ask your clients to be patient) with the inconsistencies in guidelines – the world has only been studying this strain for 6 months!

Here are the assumptions we can make based on the limited information we have. Much of this probably seems obvious to most regarding exercise while wearing a mask…feel free to share this with your clients:

Wearing a mask is less comfortable than not wearing a mask and that discomfort increases during warmer temperatures and/or humid conditions.

 

Wearing a mask will restrict breathing more than not wearing a mask.

 

You heart rate will typically be higher at the same intensity when you wear a mask compared to not wearing a mask. Dr Cedric Bryant from the American College of Exercise reports that heart rates are typically 8-10 beats per minute higher when you wear a mask compared to when you don’t. The elevated heart rate is more pronounced during intense efforts such as hill repeats or intervals.

 

Your rate of perceived exertion will be higher wearing a mask compared to not wearing a mask. It will feel like you are working harder at the same intensity.

 

Your performance will be lower wearing a mask compared to not wearing a mask at the same level of intensity.

 

If you have existing respiratory or health problems, the issues with wearing a mask will be compounded.

 

If you have poor hearing, not being able to see and read peoples’ lips make communication during exercise very challenging.

 

Understanding this information can help you and your clients make decisions about mask usage during workout sessions. At some point, each individual has to weigh the risk to benefits and decide on an approach that is the safest for them, their fellow exercise buddies and their community.

 

It’s important to note that some athletes use masks during training purposely, even prior to Covid-19, because it does make breathing more challenging therefore developing the respiratory system. Mask wearing has been likened to high-altitude training. Some athletes also opt to wear masks when environmental conditions require it such as high pollution levels, extremely cold conditions and/or high pollen levels.

Here are some tips you can share with your clients….for exercising with a mask:

Purchase a mask designed specifically for working out. Avoid paper or cotton masks.

 

Here is an article that ranks the Top 15 Masks For Working Out and there is also this article, written before COVID 19, which also ranks masks designed specifically for working out.

 

Keep in mind, it’s not clear how effective these masks are at protecting you and others from Covid-19. Some exercise-enthusiasts have found success with buffs, while others have found Face Shields to be more comfortable during exercise. Bottom line – experiment until you find an option that works best for you. Consistency in your workouts is by far more important to your overall health than discontinuing your workouts so figure out an option that works for you.

 

Once you place your mask on, avoid touching or adjusting it during your workout session. Yes, this is easier said than done!

 

Focus on slow, deep breaths while wearing a mask.

 

Exercise at lower intensities than usual when wearing a mask.

 

Take breaks when needed when wearing a mask.

 

Slow down or stop if you feel lightheaded, dizzy or nauseous when wearing a mask.

 

Consider adapting your workouts to include more rest breaks and less high-intensity intervals. Include more strength, yoga, or barre workouts compared to high-intensity cardio if you struggle with wearing a mask.

 

Keep your workouts with a mask shorter than normal and/or consider bringing a second mask if the first one becomes too damp for effective breathing.

 

Carefully remove your mask at the completion of your workout, immediately wash/sanitize your hands and wash your mask after each workout session.

Try reminding your clients that the risk for exposure outdoors is less than indoors. If they will be exercising outdoors away from others, the risk of exposure and contacting Covid-19 is very low. It would be prudent to have a mask with them in the event they do find themselves in a public setting while exercising outdoors.

 

Yours in health, fitness & business,

Sherri McMillan

https://www.businessofpt.com/2020/07/02/should-clients-wear-masks-while-exercising/#more-6146" target="_blank">https://www.businessofpt.com/2020/07/02/should-clients-wear-masks-while-exercising/#more-6146


canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series!�

Posted on June 18, 2020 at 4:10 PM Comments comments (0)

canfitpro

Don't miss these awesome keynote speakers at canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series!⁠

AUGUST:⁠

MIKE LIPKIN | Create Your Own Virtual Charisma ⁠

Emcee Carlton Braithwaith ⁠

MO HAGAN | Live Your Passion - Achieve Your Best⁠

Emcee Lawrence Biscontini⁠

SILKEN LAUMANN | UNSINKABLE: Building Resilience and Courage in a Changing World⁠

Emcee Lawrence Biscontini⁠

SEPTEMBER:⁠

SGT KEN® | Mastering the Game of Growth ™ with SGT Ken®⁠

Emcee Maureen "Mo" Hagan⁠

OCTOBER:⁠

NATHALIE PLAMONDON-THOMAS | THINK Yourself® CONFIDENT: Find Confidence & Clarity to Make Money Living Your Purpose⁠

Emcee Robert Robinson⁠

NOVEMBER:⁠

KEVIN DARBY | The Mindset Advantage⁠

Emcee Robert Robinson⁠

TODD DURKIN | Get Your Mind Right. Get Your Business Right⁠

Register now - Link in bio!

22h

canfitpro's profile picture

canfitpro

#canfitpro #canfitpro2020

22h1 likeReply


https://www.instagram.com/p/CBjS3MZHEoD/

 

 

This lady is a treasure!!!!

Posted on May 29, 2020 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

I love her saying, "If you can't change something, don't worry about it"!!

 

I'm going to put that on my bulletin board!!!

 

 

In case you think you're old?

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/b1/4b/60/b14b600cfe1d3bfce920d5513f439956.jpg

 

 

Jeanne Louise Calment had the longest confirmed human

 

Lifespan on record: 122 years and 164 days.

 

 

It seems that fate strongly approved of the way Madam Calment lived her life.

 

 

Jeanne was born in Arles, France, on 21stFebruary 1875.

 

 

When the Eiffel Tower was built, she was 14 year old.

 

 

It was at this time that she met Vincent van Gogh.

 

 

"He was dirty, badly dressed and disagreeable," she recalled in an interview given in 1988.

 

 

When she was 85, she took up fencing, and she was still riding on her bike when she reached 100.

 

 

When Jeanne was 114, she starred in a film about her life; at 115 she had an operation on her hip, and at 117 she gave up smoking (having started at the age of 21 in 1896).

 

 

Apparently, she didn't give it up for health reasons, but because she didn't like having to ask someone to help her light a cigarette once she was becoming almost blind.

 

 

In 1965, Jeanne was 90 years old and had no heirs.

 

 

She signed a deal to sell her apartment to a 47-year-old lawyer called André-François Raffray.

 

 

He agreed to pay her a monthly sum of 2,500 francs on the condition that he would inherit her apartment after she died.

 

 

However, Raffray not only ended up paying Jeanne for 30 years, but died before she did at the age of 77.

 

 

His widow was legally obliged to continue paying Madam Calment until the end of her days.

 

 

Jeanne retained sharp mental faculties.

 

 

When she was asked on her 120th birthday what kind of future she expected to have, she replied: "A very short one."

 

 

Quotes and rules of life from Jeanne Calment:

 

 

"Being young is a state of mind, it doesn't depend on one's body, I'm actually still a young girl; it's just that I haven't looked so good for the past 70 years."

 

 

"I've only got one wrinkle, and I'm sitting on it."

 

 

"All babies are beautiful."

 

 

"I've been forgotten by our good lord."

 

 

"I'm in love with wine."

 

 

"Always keep your smile. That's how I explain my long life."

 

 

"If you can't change something, don't worry about it."

 

 

"I have a huge desire to live and a big appetite, especially for sweets."

 

 

"I never wear mascara; I laugh until I cry too often."

 

 

"I see badly, I hear badly, and I feel bad, but everything's fine."

 

 

"I think I will die of laughter."

 

 

"I have legs of iron, but to tell you the truth, they're starting to rust and buckle a bit."

 

 

"I took pleasure when I could. I acted clearly and morally and without regret. I'm very lucky."

 

 

(At the end of one interview, in response to a journalist who said he hoped they would meet again the following year):

 

 

"Why not? You're not that old; you'll still be here."


 

 

 

 

 

“The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.” – Steve Jobs

Business Survey what supports Need

Posted on May 21, 2020 at 10:10 AM Comments comments (0)

Paro Centre

May 13 at 1:00 PM

Reminder: Calling all business owners if you would like to have your voice heard complete the following survey to let the Governments know what supports your business will need to recover from the Pandemic.


Complete the survey by following this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/G3R39JY" target="_blank"> https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/G3R39JY


Your business is always growing.  Now the time to find new inventive ways.


You can Canada 



Success Secrets

Posted on May 11, 2020 at 12:45 AM Comments comments (0)

I loved this article I had put away as I am decluttering.  Very appropriate for the times!!

200 SUCCESS SECRETS:

Consider yourself as an orange.  Only what is really inside can come out.  If you fill your mind with thoughts of serenity, positivity, strength, courage and compassion, when someone squeezeds you, this is the only juice that can flow.                - Robin Sharma

  1. Goal Setting:  Where are you going and how are you going to get there!!
  2. Nutrition and What is Really Takes to Lose One Pound of Fat: Servings and portions and all that technical stuff we need to know so we are not confused by that darn 5 pounds of fluid that ebbs and flows like a blinking tide!  The more you know the more you are in control!!
  3. Time Management:  How are we going to fit this into our already busy, busy day!!  And like It - no love it!!
  4. Motivation: Remind me!!  Why is it we are doing this again??
  5. Stress Management:  It is 5:30pm!!  What do you mean head office needs the market analysis by 8:00am tomorrow morning??
  6. Success Programs are for Life: You bet they are!!

 One hour Outdoors and in the Studio: We will do a combination of: Cardio: (you will need runners - No, No!  We aren't going to jog/run - at least not right away!!) [unless you are doing already.]  

Strength Training:  using Exercise/Stability Balls (you have to buy - if you don't already own one that gets batted and moved around the house - because yes, there is homework!!) and Resistance Bands (which I will provide and will also be used for your homework)

Flexibility: Okay - relax - enjoy!!  Homework: Absolutely!!  Making healthy nutritional choices and adding exercise into your life on a daily basis in nothing more than creating a habit!

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16079300-top-200-secrets-of-success" target="_blank">THE TOP 200 Secrets of Success             Thttps://hiregange.com/assets/articles/14-04-01_success-mantra-robin.pdf" target="_blank">he Top 200 Secrets of Success and the Pillars of S elf-Mastery  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.cpviet.apps.book.secrets_of_success&hl=en" target="_blank">FREE - App


Things to accomplish before Start Working

Posted on April 17, 2020 at 12:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Like most business owners and entrepreneurs, you’ve got a list of things to accomplish before you actually start working:

 

Check your email and follow up on any time-sensitive emails and internal messages

Review today’s schedule of video conferences and team meetings

Catch up on industry news and important events that have an impact on your business

Go over metrics from recent promotions and look for ways to improve performance...

 

You get the picture.

 

But did you notice that when you read a list like that ^^^, it’s much easier to imagine yourself actually achieving those tasks, versus when it’s jumbled into a block of text? Like...

 

Today I have to check my email, review my schedule for the day, catch up with the sales team on the status of their weekly metrics, walk the dog, follow up with Jim to about the client proposal, feed the cat, check Google Analytics for funnel performance metrics and see where we can optimize, and take the kids to soccer.

 

You probably didn’t even read all that ^^^, and I don’t blame you. Because it’s easy to skip over important copy if nothing looks important.

 

Well...

 

...the same can be said for your sales messages.

 

And if your emails and landing pages aren’t converting as well as they should be, you’ve just added another thing to your to-do list.

 

My Sales-Boosting Bullets Playbook breaks down the essential elements your copy must have to get your customers’ eyes on the most important details of your products or services.

 

Because when you create bulleted lists of information for your prospects to read you:

 

Build curiosity and a sense of urgency in your reader

Get right to the point by stripping away the "fluff" that makes copy too long

Focus their attention on a skimmable, time-saving list of benefits that your customers can immediately connect with

 

If you’re not using bullets, you’re making it too hard for your customers to know that YOU have what they want.

 

Snag my $7 Sales Boosting Bullet’s Playbook right now and start persuading your prospects with the proven sales copy method that gets results.

SAVE 74% ON THIS PLAYBOOK »

Talk soon,

Ryan

 

Ryan Deiss

Co-Founder & CEO

DigitalMarketer