Anne  Parr  PRO TRAINER   Fitness  Instructor  Specialist     

          
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World Mental Health Day!

Posted on May 5, 2021 at 9:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Key facts

There are many different mental disorders, with different presentations. They are generally characterized by a combination of abnormal thoughts, perceptions, emotions, behaviour and relationships with others.

Mental disorders include: depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other psychoses, dementia, and developmental disorders including autism.

There are effective strategies for preventing mental disorders such as depression.

There are effective treatments for mental disorders and ways to alleviate the suffering caused by them.

Access to health care and social services capable of providing treatment and social support is key.

Depression is so often not recognized and can last for years before detected personally speaking.

Depression is a common mental disorder and one of the main causes of disability worldwide. Globally, an estimated 264 million people are affected by depression.1 More women are affected than men.

 

Depression is characterized by sadness, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, tiredness, and poor concentration. People with depression may also have multiple physical complaints with no apparent physical cause. Depression can be long-lasting or recurrent, substantially impairing people’s ability to function at work or school and to cope with daily life. At its most severe, depression can lead to suicide.

 

Prevention programmes have been shown to reduce depression, both for children (e.g. through protection and psychological support following physical and sexual abuse) and adults (e.g. through psychosocial assistance after disasters and conflicts).

 

There are also effective treatments. Mild to moderate depression can be effectively treated with talking therapies, such as cognitive behaviour therapy or psychotherapy. Antidepressants can be an effective form of treatment for moderate to severe depression but are not the first line of treatment for cases of mild depression. They should not be used for treating depression in children and are not the first line of treatment in adolescents, among whom they should be used with caution.

 

Management of depression should include psychosocial aspects, including identifying stress factors, such as financial problems, difficulties at work or physical or mental abuse, and sources of support, such as family members and friends. The maintenance or reactivation of social networks and social activities is important.

The overall objective of World Mental Health Day is to raise awareness of mental health issues around the world and to mobilize efforts in support of mental health.

 

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-mental-health-day" target="_blank">The Day provides an opportunity for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work, and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

Mental Health Week May 3 - 9th 2021

https://rock95.com/cmhas-mental-health-week-may-3rd-9th/" target="_blank">CMHA'S 

Mental Health Week May 3 - 9th

Posted on May 3, 2021 at 8:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Recognizing Mental Health 

Can be a dilemma more these days as we become more isolated with our own space, mind loves to play games beating us down so:

Today be Mindful be aware!

Forgetting things may be a sign of depression not loosing your mind.


Day 1 BE MINDFUL all day.

#getreal    #canfitpro #mindfulness

Anne


The hidden dangers of protein powders

Posted on April 8, 2021 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)

 

They may contain added sugar, calories, or even toxic chemicals.

Adding protein powder to a glass of milk or a smoothie may seem like a simple way to boost your health. After, all, protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle, bone strength, and numerous body functions. And many older adults don't consume enough protein because of a reduced appetite.

But be careful: a scoop of chocolate or vanilla protein powder can harbor health risks. "I don't recommend using protein powders except in a few instances, and only with supervision," says registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.

What is protein powder?

Protein powders are powdered forms of protein that come from plants (soybeans, peas, rice, potatoes, or hemp), eggs, or milk (casein or whey protein). The powders may include other ingredients such as added sugars, artificial flavoring, thickeners, vitamins, and minerals. The amount of protein per scoop can vary from 10 to 30 grams. Supplements used for building muscle contain relatively more protein, and supplements used for weight loss contain relatively less.

What are the risks?

There are numerous risks to consider when using a protein powder. Among them:

A protein powder is a dietary supplement. The FDA leaves it up to manufacturers to evaluate the safety and labeling of products. So, there's no way to know if a protein powder contains what manufacturers claim.

We don't know the long-term effects. "There are limited data on the possible side effects of high protein intake from supplements," McManus says.

It may cause digestive distress. "People with dairy allergies or trouble digesting lactose [milk sugar] can experience gastrointestinal discomfort if they use a milk-based protein powder," McManus points out.

It may be high in added sugars and calories. Some protein powders have little added sugar, and others have a lot (as much as 23 grams per scoop). Some protein powders wind up turning a glass of milk into a drink with more than 1,200 calories. The risk: weight gain and an unhealthy spike in blood sugar. The American Heart Association recommends a limit of 24 grams of added sugar per day for women and 36 grams for men.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-hidden-dangers-of-protein-powders?utm_content=buffer2bb31&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=buffer#HarvardHealth" target="_blank">A new risk revealed

 

From Harvard Health

 

 

April 7 World Health Day

Posted on April 7, 2021 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (0)

7 April is World Health Day

It is celebrated annually and each year draws attention to a specific health topic of concern to people all over the world.

 

The date of 7 April marks the anniversary of the founding of WHO in 1948.

World Health Day 2021  https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-health-day/2021" target="_blank">Building a fairer, healthier world 2021

7 April 2020 is the day to celebrate the work of nurses and midwives and remind world leaders of the critical role they play in keeping the world healthy. Nurses and other health workers are at the forefront of COVID-19 response - providing high quality, respectful treatment and care, leading community dialogue to address fears and questions and, in some instances, collecting data for clinical studies. Quite simply, without nurses, there would be no response.

 

In this International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife, World Health Day will highlight the current status of nursing and around the world. WHO and its partners will make a series of recommendations to strengthen of the nursing and midwifery workforce.

 

This will be vital if we are to achieve national and global targets related to universal health coverage, maternal and child health, infectious and non-communicable diseases including mental health, emergency preparedness and response, patient safety and the delivery of integrated, people-centered care, amongst others.

 

We are calling for your support on World Health Day to ensure that the nursing and midwifery workforces are strong enough to ensure that everyone, everywhere gets the healthcare they need.

 

The tagline for World Health Day is:https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-health-day/2020" target="_blank"> Support nurses and midwives.2010

Universal health coverage is WHO’s number one goal. Key to achieving it is ensuring that everyone can obtain the care they need, when they need it, right in the heart of the community.

 

Progress is being made in countries in all regions of the world.

 

But millions of people still have no access at all to health care. Millions more are forced to choose between health care and other daily expenses such as food, clothing and even a home.

 

This is why WHO is focusing on universal health coverage for this year’shttps://www.who.int/campaigns/world-health-day/2019" target="_blank"> World Health Day, on 7 April.2019

World Health Day 2018 - https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2018/04/07/default-calendar/world-health-day-2018" target="_blank">Universal health coverage:

World Health Day 2017 -https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2017/04/07/default-calendar/world-health-day-2017" target="_blank"> Depression: let's talk

World Health Day 2016: https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2016/04/07/default-calendar/world-health-day-2016" target="_blank">Beat Diabetes 


Become a Nordic Pole Walking Instructor

Posted on March 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Become a Nordic Pole Walking Instructor

NPW Instructor Certification Clinic - Halifax

March 27, 2021, 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Atlantic Time

Online via Zoom

 Learn how to methodically teach the effective Nordic Pole Walking technique developed in Europe

 Learn about the scientific and clinical studies of Nordic Pole Walking

 Chief Instructor Trainers: Bill & Esther VanGorder.

 Discuss promotion and marketing support of Nordixx Pole Walking Canada and Atlantic distributors,

Esther & Bill VanGorder of Nordic Pole Walking Nova Scotia.

The course is limited to 12 candidates. Fee: $195.00 plus HST to be paid at time of registration.

The Nordixx Nordic Pole Walking Instructor's 8.5 Hr. Course includes: Pair of Nordixx Global

Walker poles, practical Instruction & Course Package, your own copy of the PowerPoint presentation to

use with your classes, teaching methods and instruction in the proper Nordic Pole Walking technique,

Nordic Pole Walking handouts for you to customize for use with your students, plus a set of Nordixx

Walker Poles. Successful applicants will receive 4.0 CEC credits from CanFitPro Canada, a Nordic Pole

Walking Instructor Diploma, access to online research and training information, Promotional page on

our website & social media for your courses, Instructor prices on all poles and supplies, no charge to

attend future Certification Clinics to update your knowledge and Instructor Information Package.

To Register for the Instructor Certification Course or for more information contact

Esther VanGorder, Nordic Pole Walking Nova Scotia Phone: 902 454 2267

Email: Esther@NordicWalkingNovaScotia.ca Mail: 5545 Stanley Place, Halifax NS B3K2E8

Registration closes 10 days prior to the event.

Bill & Esther VanGorder are Certified Nordic Pole Walking instructors, Directors of Nordic

Walking Nova Scotia and experienced fitness instructors. Bill has a lengthy background in health and

fitness including 28 years with the YMCA & 15 years as CEO of the Lung Association of Nova Scotia. Bill &

Esther have been certified Nordic Pole Walking Instructors for 14 years

https://nordicwalkingnovascotia.ca/instructor.pdf" target="_blank">https://nordicwalkingnovascotia.ca/instructor.pdf


canfitpro All Access Pass Apri 10 l/May 4 / Aug 13-14

Posted on March 15, 2021 at 10:40 AM Comments comments (0)

All Access Pass Get all events April 10 - May 4th and August 13 - 14 

https://www.canfitpro.com/events2021/?mkt_tok=NDEzLVhBSi0wODAAAAF7xnq2qVE2fDRJNtjscXiV3QIZet0QH-mnDWZki9kGMkHfD2kzwuPf6HAc1ScE7kZ8_28DcvXvPYDSxuZPgWA1sVBmcgGf54gsRABJapc" target="_blank">Register Now

Get on board today! 

https://www.canfitpro.com/events2021/?mkt_tok=NDEzLVhBSi0wODAAAAF7xnq2qVE2fDRJNtjscXiV3QIZet0QH-mnDWZki9kGMkHfD2kzwuPf6HAc1ScE7kZ8_28DcvXvPYDSxuZPgWA1sVBmcgGf54gsRABJapc" target="_blank">

All-Access Pass!

 

3 Events:

(FitPro, Business, Global Conference & Trade Show)

 

Only $249* (savings of $78)

 

 

Access over 100 world-class presenters and sessions while earning 8 CECs!

 

Discover over 15 areas of specialty education including Group Fitness, Personal Training, Business and Leadership, Technology, Nutrition, Coaching, Wellness, Yoga, Dance, and more!

 

Big member benefit! canfitpro members will automatically receive access to post-event recordings.

Non-members can gain access to post-event recordings by becoming a member or by selecting the $20 add-on during registration.

Another super event keeping you engaged and learning 

Anne Parr PRO TRAINER FIS

Why getting active is key for women�??s overall health & wellbeing

Posted on March 12, 2021 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Why getting active is key for women’s overall health & wellbeing

Whether it be 20-year-old tennis phenom Bianca Andreescu, or international soccer icon Christine Sinclair, or up-and-coming WNBA superstar Kia Nurse, Canadian women are dominating the world stage of sports and athletics while inspiring a generation of young women to live an active lifestyle.

 

With March 8th being International Women’s Day, we wanted to shine a light on some amazing Canadian female athletes while also analyzing some of biggest health benefits women can experience when they get active.

 

Unfortunately, despite the recent success of female Canadian athletes across a wide range of pro sports, amateur athletics and Olympic competition, not enough young women are involved with sports and athletics – which directly impacts their chances of embracing physical activity as an adult.

 

A recent study shows that 41 per cent of girls between the ages of three to 17 don’t participate in sport, indicating further that if girls do not engage in sport or physical activity by age 10 there is only a 10 per cent chance she will be active as an adult. That is far too many women missing out on the life-changing effects (both physical and mental) of living an active lifestyle, which obviously becomes even more critical once females enter their 40s, 50s, and 60s.

Keep Reading Find these and more at: https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/blog/4-major-health-benefits-of-women-engaging-in-regular-physical-activity-sport?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email_EN&utm_campaign=March_Newsletter2021&utm_content=Hero_link&utm_term=Woman%20doing%20yoga%20at%20home&&&&&cm_mmc=Act-On%20Software-_-email-_-Celebrating%20International%20Women%5Cu2019s%20Day%20%2B%20Our%20Newest%20Active%20Champion%21-_-Woman%20doing%20yoga%20at%20home" target="_blank">PARTICIPACTION - March

Some useful COVID information rom the Johns Hopkins Hospital

Posted on March 5, 2021 at 9:10 AM Comments comments (4)

FINALLY! Some useful COVID information --- from the Johns Hopkins Hospital Here is some very useful COVID information from the Johns Hopkins Hospital information sheet relative to Coronavirus 19. It is extremely informative and seems to be about the latest release of personal handling of this medical issue and is worth the time to study the information given for your personal care. Stay safe and stay well.

This certainly makes the COVID -19 protection methods more understandable.

* This virus is not a living organism. It is a protein molecule (RNA or DNA) covered by a protective layer of lipid (fat), which, when absorbed by the cells of the ocular (eyes), nasal (nose) or buccal mucosa (mouth), changes their genetic code (mutates) and converts into aggressor and multiplier cells.

* Since the virus is not a living organism, but is a protein molecule, it cannot be killed. It has to decay on its own. The disintegration time depends on the temperature, humidity and type of material where it lies.

* The virus is very fragile; the only thing that protects it is a thin outer layer of fat, and that is the reason why soap or detergent is the best weapon. The foam CUTS THE FAT (that is why you have to scrub for 20 seconds or more, to create lots of foam). By dissolving the fat layer, the protein molecule disperses and breaks down.

* HEAT melts fat; this is why it is necessary to use water above 77 degrees for hand washing, laundry and cleaning surfaces. In addition, hot water makes more foam, making it more effective.

* Alcohol or any mixture with alcohol over 65% DISSOLVES ALL FAT, especially the external lipid layer of the virus.

* Any solution with 1 part bleach and 5 parts water directly dissolves the protein, breaking it down from the inside.

* Oxygenated water increases the effectiveness of soap, alcohol, and chlorine, because peroxide dissolves the virus protein. However, because you have to use it in its pure form, it can damage your skin.

* NO BACTERICIDE OR ANTIBIOTIC WILL WORK , because the virus is not a living organism like bacteria; antibodies cannot kill what is not alive

* The virus molecules remain very stable at colder temperatures, including air conditioning in houses and cars. They also need moisture and darkness to stay stable. Therefore, dehumidified, dry, warm and right environments will degrade the virus faster.

* UV LIGHT on any object that may contain the virus breaks down the protein. Be careful, it also breaks down collagen (which is protein) in the skin.

* The virus CANNOT go through healthy skin.

* Vinegar is NOT useful because it does not break down the protective layer of fat.

* NO SPIRITS, NOR VODKA, serve. The strongest vodka is only 40% alcohol, and you need a minimum of 65%.

* LISTERINE is 65% alcohol.

* The more confined the space, the higher the concentration of the virus there can be. The more open or naturally ventilated, the less.

* You have to wash your hands before and after touching any commonly used surfaces such as: mucosa (mouth area), food, locks, knobs, switches, remotes, cell phones, watches, computers, desks etc… and don’t forget when you use the bathroom.

* You have to MOISTURIZE YOUR HANDS due to frequent washing. Dry hands have cracks and the molecules can hide in the micro cracks. The thicker the moisturizer, the better.

* Also keep your NAILS SHORT so that the virus does not hide there.

Now for some additional input:

Dr. Bonnie Henry is the Provincial Health Officer for British Columbia, the first woman in this position She is also an associate professor at the University of British Columbia. She has a background in epidemiology and is a specialist in public health and preventive medicine. She is also from PEI (Prince Edward Island).

The Wisdom of Dr. Bonnie Henry

1. We may have to live with COVID-19 for months, or years. Let's not deny it or panic. Let's not make our lives useless. Let's learn to live with this fact.

2. You can't destroy COVID-19 viruses that have penetrated cell walls, by drinking gallons of hot water you'll just go to the bathroom more often.

3. Washing hands and maintaining a two-meter physical distance is the best method for your protection.

4. If you don't have a COVID-19 patient at home, there's no need to disinfect the surfaces at your house

5. Packaged cargo, gas pumps, shopping carts and ATMs do not cause infection. If you wash your hands, live your life as usual.

6. COVID-19 is not a food infection. It is associated with drops of infection like the 'flu’. There is no demonstrated risk that COVID-19 is transmitted by food.

7. You can lose your sense of smell with a lot of allergies and viral infections. This is only a non-specific symptom of COVID-19.

8. Once at home, you don't need to change your clothes urgently and go shower! Purity is a virtue, paranoia is not!

9. The COVID-19 virus doesn't hang in the air for long This is a respiratory droplet infection that requires close contact.

10. The air is clean; you can walk through the gardens and through parks (just keeping your physical protection distance).

11. It is sufficient to use normal soap against COVID-19, not antibacterial soap. This is a virus, not a bacterium.

12. You don't have to worry about your food orders. But you can heat it all up in the microwave if you wish.

13. The chances of bringing COVID-19 home with your shoes is like being struck by lightning twice in a day. I've been working against viruses for 20 years — drop infections don't spread like that!

14. You can't be protected from the virus by taking vinegar, sugarcane juice and ginger! These are for immunity not a cure.

15. Wearing a mask for long periods interferes with your breathing and oxygen levels. Wear it only in crowds.

16 Wearing gloves is also a bad idea; the virus can accumulate into the glove and be easily transmitted if you touch your face. Better just to wash your hands regularly.

Immunity is weakened by always staying in a sterile environment. Even if you eat immune boosting foods, please go out of your house regularly to any park/beach. Immunity is increased by EXPOSURE TO PATHOGENS, not by sitting at home and consuming fried/ spicy/sugary food and aerated drinks.

Be smart and stay informed! Live life sensibly and to the fullest.

Be Kind, Be Calm and Be Safe!

 

CHALLENGES RELATED TO DIET, NUTRITION, AND EXERCISE IN DIABETES

Posted on February 26, 2021 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)

CHALLENGES RELATED TO DIET, NUTRITION, AND EXERCISE IN DIABETES

Twitter

 

 

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM ©2021

https://us.humankinetics.com/blogs/nutrition-and-healthy-eating-webinars/challenges-related-to-diet-nutrition-and-exercise-in-diabetes?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nutrition-feb21&dlv-emuid=c8f00eaf-34d6-418a-b1d3-26459c5785a8&dlv-mlid=2783579" target="_blank">YOU MUST LOG IN TO WATCH THIS WEBINAR RECORDING.

 

Lifestyle changes adopted to manage diabetes and prediabetes include not only more physical activity, but also improvements in diet and nutrition. One trend that many are following is low-carb eating, but that can impact a person's ability to be active and perform well. Learn the ins and outs of dietary plans, adequate nutrition, and select supplements on your or your clients' exercise programming. 

 

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM, is an author, exercise physiologist, lecturer, consultant, and professor emerita of exercise science (Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia). In 2016, she was the recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes award. A respected researcher and lecturer, she has authored more than 400 articles on exercise, diabetes, and health; 28 book chapters; and over a dozen books, including Diabetes-Free Kids, The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan, 50 Secrets of the Longest Living People With Diabetes, The Science of Staying Young, Diabetic Athlete’s Handbook, The Diabetes Breakthrough, and Diabetes & Keeping Fit for Dummies.

 

A distinguished graduate of Stanford University (BA), University of California at Davis (MA), and University of California at Berkeley (PhD), Colberg consults professionally for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) on numerous committees and projects. As a world-renowned expert and opinion leader, she has developed the exercise guidelines related to diabetes for most of these premier professional organizations, and she is interviewed frequently by various media outlets. In addition, she continues to be involved in consulting and in clinical research on exercise, diabetes, and healthy lifestyles.

 

With over 50 years of personal experience as an exerciser living with type 1 diabetes, Colberg continues to live a healthy, active lifestyle and serve as a role model for others who want to live long and well with (or without) diabetes. She enjoys working out regularly on conditioning machines, swimming, biking, fitness walking, weight training, and hiking with her husband and family in coastal California.


Sharing from Human Kinetics

National Pancake day

Posted on February 16, 2021 at 8:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The key ingredient to the perfect breakfast, this February 16 get yourself a mouth-watering stack toward heaven because it’s National Pancake Day!

Observed annually in Spring, and since beginning its first celebration in 2006, IHOP restaurants have raised over $24 million to support charities in the communities in which they operate.

We grew up observing Pancake Tuesday it prepares you for fasting for 40 days in LENT.

National Pancake Day is celebrated on February 16 every year. A thin flat cake prepared with a batter made from milk, eggs, flour, and oil or butter, the pancake and its variations are found in almost every culture.

Also known as Johnnycakes, griddle cakes or hotcakes, this batter-made breakfast item dates back more than 30,000 years. In fact, it may be the oldest breakfast food in history, spanning as far back as the Stone Age and even found in the stomach of Otzi the Iceman, who’s human remains are estimated to be 5,300 years old.

 

The Middle English word ‘pancake’ first appeared in English in the 15th century however, Ancient Greeks and Romans made what were called Alita Dolcia or “another sweet” with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk. Greek Poets, Cratinus and Magnes wrote about them in their poetry and Shakespeare mentions them in his famous plays. During the English Renaissance, pancakes were flavored with spices, rosewater, sherry, and apples. This practice of pouring batter on a pan and frying it is common in nearly every culture around the world.

 

In the UK, they’ve celebrated Shrove Tuesday since 1100 A.D. It is the day before Ash Wednesday, also referred to in other places as Fat Tuesday. This very popular Feast Day is observed through participating in confession, finalizing a lenten sacrifice, as well as consuming pancakes and other sweets.

 

This year guests from around the country will once again celebrate National Pancake Day at IHOP and enjoy a free short stack of Buttermilk pancakes. In return for the free pancakes, guests will be asked to consider leaving a donation to designated local charities. This is your opportunity to contribute to your community and enjoy a delicious meal. Don’t miss out!

https://nationaltoday.com/national-pancake-day/?utm_source=vero&utm_medium=email&utm_content=b&utm_campaign=Feb%2015th%20Newsletter&utm_term=Newsletter&vero_id=smihlen%40dandsi.com&vero_conv=QtTLRrle1_K21ZvULOuBqe6ZGnxDGjgTH9Bl2v-i-vBblv_jM6sUmc64xGrs_0OFPFwnGHPDGCzNqNw_ESAtNdH8lU68vdgd9A%3D%3D" target="_blank">https://nationaltoday.com/national-pancake-day/?utm_source=vero&utm_medium=email&utm_content=b&utm_campaign=Feb%2015th%20Newsletter&utm_term=Newsletter&vero_id=smihlen%40dandsi.com&vero_conv=QtTLRrle1_K21ZvULOuBqe6ZGnxDGjgTH9Bl2v-i-vBblv_jM6sUmc64xGrs_0OFPFwnGHPDGCzNqNw_ESAtNdH8lU68vdgd9A%3D%3D

How to survive a heart attack when you are alone!

Posted on February 15, 2021 at 2:30 PM Comments comments (0)

I hope everyone can send this on as it is really important for everyone to know!

1. Let's say it's 7:25 pm and you're going home (alone of course) after an unusually hard day on the job.

2. You're really tired, upset and frustrated.

3. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to drag out into your arm and up into your jaw.

  You are only about five km from the hospital nearest your home.

4. Unfortunately you don't know if you'll be able to make it that far.

5. You have been trained in CPR, but the guy that taught the course did not tell you how to perform it on yourself.

6. HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE?

Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousnes.

7. However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously.

A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest.

A breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let-up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again.

8 . Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it to regain a normal rhythm.

In this way, heart attack victims can get help or to a hospital.

9. . Tell as many other people as possible about this. It could save their lives!

10. . A cardiologist says: "If everyone who gets this email & kindly sends it to 10 people, you can bet that we'll save at least one life 

11. Rather than sending jokes, please contribute by forwarding this email which can save a person's life....

 12. If this message comes around to you ..... more than once..... please don't get irritated.... We all need to be happy that we have many friends who care about us and we are being reminded of how to tackle... Heart attacks.... when we are alone.

 

This comes from Dr. Patrick Teefy, Cardiology Head at the Nuclear Medicine Institute University Hospital, London Ont.


3 active tech-tools to help you achieve your goals this year

Posted on February 3, 2021 at 3:15 PM Comments comments (0)

The Active Champions Series is a new monthly showcase of compelling stories from influential Canadians who make physical activity and sport a key part of their everyday lives. We hope these Active Champions will inspire Canadians everywhere to move a little bit more every single day.

https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/blog/3-active-tech-tools-to-help-you-achieve-your-goals-this-year" target="_blank">“Getting outside, being physical, & enjoying some fresh air helps build a relationship with the natural environment & love for the outdoors.”

Smash your goals & resolutions with physical activity

Accomplishing goals, especially around the New Year, can be tricky. But, instead of getting discouraged, why not set yourself up for success with the right know-how and tools to achieve even the toughest of goals? Whether it be nailing a big job promotion, learning a new skill or even just getting a few more active minutes in each week, always be prepared!

 

The same can be said for New Year’s resolutions. With so many Canadians giving up on their resolutions within the first six weeks of the year, it’s important to set reasonable goals and to set yourself up to achieve them.

 

When it comes to physical activity and getting active, be sure to set realistic resolutions and goals that are tailored to you. For example, if you are new to physical activity and are just getting started, don’t expect to run a marathon in a few weeks (if you do, amazing, but don’t stress it). Give yourself time to work toward that goal, get prepared and start moving as much as you comfortably can. By progressing slowly and having a plan in place to address barriers, you’ll be checking off that goal in no time.

 

Tap into some free tech to help you stay motivated to move

Look, we get it, home workout gear and gadgets can be seriously expensive, and where are you going to put all of it? But what if we had you covered with three awesome (and free) tech-related tools to keep you motivated to not only reach your goals and resolutions, but to smash them? Look no further:

 

True North app challenge – No one embraces the cold weather quite like Canadians, so let’s celebrate everything that makes a great Canadian winter with the True North Challenge!

 

Get started by downloading our free app, forming a team of two to eight people, sharing your team code with the rest of your crew and start moving for chances at amazing prizes! Mark your calendar: the challenge starts Monday January 18th, 2020.

 

Kick-starter workout downloadable PDF – One of the hardest parts about achieving goals and nailing resolutions is the very beginning. Getting started can be tough, but don’t stress it, we have your back with this handy and downloadable kick-starter workout PDF. Print it out, tack it up somewhere visible and try to complete it once or twice a week. Then increase the frequency as you get comfortable. Challenge yourself in all the right ways!

ParticipACTION workout videos – Two iconic Canadian organizations, ParticipACTION and the YMCA of Greater Toronto, have teamed up to help Canadians stay active and healthy, no matter where they are in their fitness journey.

 

We have all your workout video needs covered with a new series of videos featured in our app. Our partnership kicks off with a trio of new in-app videos focusing on the different levels of exercise intensity.

 

The True North Challenge is coming to the

https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/blog/3-active-tech-tools-to-help-you-achieve-your-goals-this-year" target="_blank">PARTICIPACTION 

Let's Move: Virtual Wellbeing Interventions to Combat Isolation

Posted on January 26, 2021 at 8:40 AM Comments comments (0)

Tuesday, January 26th

2:00 pm EST / 1:00 pm CST / 12:00 pm MST / 11:00 am PST / 3:00 pm AST

50 minutes of education followed by 10 minutes of Live Q&A

All are welcome, but space is limited.

This is a Free Education Event with an optional CEC Quiz available for purchase

Click Here to Register!

In this webinar you will learn:

How to bring your clients and participants together online to promote social connections.

Ideas to pivot your adult gym-goers online while maintaining your business income (with Fyonna Vanderwerf).

About online activities that enhance health and stress resiliency within the Actively Aging population (with Tiffany Moffatt).

How to nurture online groups that support moms, kids, and families (with Alison Coombs).

Register now!

Only a few spots remain for today’s webinar at 2:00 PM EST. Register now to learn how to help your virtual communities thrive and stay positive in the dark days of a pandemic winter.

See you at the webinar!

 

canfitpro Certification Department

 

 

P.S. Not yet certified to teach group fitness? Until January 31st, take $100 off the Fitness Instructor Specialist certification package 1 with code SCHOOLFIT. The course is offered virtually, facilitated live by a PRO TRAINER (like two of today’s webinar Presenters, Tiffany and Fyonna)! Learn how to bring people together, teaching group fitness online, and in-person. Click here to learn more and register for a course!

 


Exercise Perscription for Mental Health

Posted on January 23, 2021 at 11:10 AM Comments comments (0)

Loved this article 

BY IGOR KLIBANOV

As a fitness professional, you undoubtedly know how prevalent mental health issues are, and you may even work with people who have them. However, there’s very little specific information on how to make it better (other than “exercise is good for you”) and any improvements that come are simply a side effect of exercise. But what if there was a direct way to exercise specifically for improvement of mental health issues? That’s exactly what we’ll cover in this article.

 

If your clients have noticed that they:

 

Have lost pleasure in activities that they really used to enjoy

Aren’t taking care of themselves as much

Are neglecting certain relationships

Performing worse at their work than they used to

Then this article is for you.

 

We’ll discuss the exercise prescription for mental health issues. I use that word, “prescription” very precisely. After all, when a doctor prescribes a medication, there’s a lot of precision behind it. S/he tells you:

 

The name of the medication

The dose

Whether you should take it with food, or away from food

Whether you should take it in the morning, or the evening

But, when the doctor recommends exercise, well, the recommendation is vague. You don’t know exactly how to do it. You need the exercise prescription for different conditions:

 

The type: cardio, strength training, or stretching

The frequency: how many days per week. It’s not always a “more is better” type of scenario. With some things there’s a “sweet spot”.

The duration: how long you exercise for, or how many sets and reps

The intensity: at what percent of your maximal effort do you exercise?

CARDIO VS. STRENGTH TRAINING

Although the occasional study finds that cardio is more effective, most studies find no difference in effectiveness between cardio and strength training.

 

In one study, researchers divided participants into two groups:

 

Group 1 did cardio, three times per week, for one hour, at an intensity of 80% of their maximal heart rate.

 

Group 2 did strength training, three times per week for one hour. They did 10 exercises, in a circuit format, making sure their heart rate did not rise above 50-60% of their estimated maximum.

 

Group 3 was the control group. They did not exercise.

 

Both groups one and two had similar improvements in mental health (as judged by their depression score). After the study, around 80% of the people in groups one and two no longer met the diagnostic criteria for depression. But only 17% of the people in group three no longer met the diagnostic criteria for depression.

 

In another study, participants with mental health issues, whose average age was 71, participated in high-intensity strength training and, after 10 weeks, those who were in the exercise group had a 54% improvement in their mental health.

 

FREQUENCY

How many days per week is better – one, three, five? Or is it like medications, where if you don’t take it for one day, the effect completely goes away, in which case, you need to take it every day, seven days per week?

 

That’s what this study tried to answer. In here, researchers divided participants into five groups:

 

Group 1: control group (stretching)

Group 2: burned 7 kcal/kg/week, across 3 days

Group 3: burned 7 kcal/kg/week, across 5 days

Group 4: burned 17.5 kcal/kg/week, across 3 days

Group 5: burned 17.5 kcal/kg/week, across 5 days

In this case, there was no difference between the two groups that burned 7 kcal/kg/week, and the group that didn’t exercise at all. None of those three groups saw much of an improvement in mental health. However, both groups that exercised at 17.5 kcal/kg/week saw reductions in symptoms of mental illness that were similar to each other. After 12 weeks of following this program, the reduction in mental illness symptoms was about 47%.

 

From this preliminary evidence, it seems like there’s not much of a difference between three times per week, and five times per week, as long as you cross a certain energy expenditure threshold. Is there a greater effect for even greater calorie expenditures? Maybe. But, as far as I know, that research has not yet been done yet.

 

INTENSITY

So, now that we know the type (cardio and strength training are about even), the frequency (not much of a difference between three and five times per week), what’s the intensity required to reduce mental health issues? Should you take it easy? Or should you really push?

 

That’s what this study tried to find out.

 

Researchers divided participants into three groups:

 

Group 1 was a control group (they didn’t exercise)

 

Group 2 did strength training at 80% of their maximum weight, three times per week for eight weeks.

 

Group 3 did the exact same exercises, repetitions, and frequency as group 2, but they did it with only 20% of their maximum weight.

 

The results:

 

21% of the people in group 1 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks. Without exercise. Without medication. Without psychotherapy. It just happened.

61% of the people in group 2 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks.

28% of the people in group 3 had a reduction in their mental health issues after eight weeks

What’s our conclusion? High intensity (over 75% of your maximum) is superior to low intensity when it comes to mental health improvement. This study looked at strength training, but other studies saw the same effect for cardio.

 

DURATION

Is this a case of “more is better”, or is this a case of “just right”? Unfortunately, this variable hasn’t been as well studied as frequency, intensity, and type. However, one preliminary study concluded that duration and intensity are much less important than frequency.

 

In terms of weeks/months, although small, transient reductions are seen with just a single exercise session. To see large, consistent, long-term reductions, you should exercise for at least 9 weeks, according to this study.

 

EXERCISE VS. MEDICATIONS

And now, the million-dollar question: how do medications compare to exercise when it comes to mental health improvement?

 

One meta-analysis (a study of several studies), from the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology looked at this question in very significant detail and found that exercise is equally effective to medications in the treatment of mental health issues. And, when the two are combined, the medications work even better.

 

HOW EXERCISE WORK ON MENTAL HEALTH?

It’s nice to know what works, but “why” does exercise help relieve mental health issues? What are the mechanisms involved?

 

Reason #1: Endorphins

 

When you exercise at a high intensity, it’s physically uncomfortable. You’re out of breath and your muscles are burning. Your body doesn’t like that, so it releases “pain-blocking” chemicals called “endorphins.” It makes sense why the high intensity is required for mental health improvement. It has to be uncomfortable enough to trigger the release of endorphins. Low intensity is too comfortable for endorphin release. It blocks physical pain, but along with that, it helps emotional pain, as is seen in mental illness.

 

Reason #2: Self Efficacy Hypothesis

 

Often, a person who suffers from mental health issues has the feeling like their life is out of control. Things are happening to them and they are helpless against circumstances. Exercise gives you a sense of control. You know that if you go for an intense 20-minute workout, you’ll feel better. And who controls when you work out? You do! Who controls how long you work out? You do! Who controls how hard you work out? You do!

 

Reason #3: Distraction

 

Sometimes exercise just works because you’re focused on how hard you’re breathing and how much your muscles are burning. You are able to forget whatever is stressing you out.

 

Reason #4: Sleep Improvement

 

It’s very well-known that people who exercise usually sleep better. People who sleep better have better moods.

 

Reason #5: Serotonin

 

Serotonin is the “happy chemical” and when it’s released you feel content and relaxed. Exercise helps increase serotonin in the brain.

 

ABOUT IGOR KLIBANOV

Igor Klibanov is the author of five books on fitness and nutrition, including The Mental Health Prescription, as well as the CEO of one of Toronto’s premier personal training companies, Fitness Solutions Plus. He was selected as one of the top five personal trainers in Toronto by the Metro News newspaper, and has performed approximately 400 speaking engagements, many of which have been to some of Canada’s largest corporations (including RBC, IBM, Intact Insurance, and others).

 

Additionally, he has multiple programs for personal trainers to enhance their skills and is a regular speaker at various personal training conferences.

https://www.canfitpro.com/2020/10/19/exercise-prescription-for-mental-health/

Unlock Ypur Hips Flexors

Posted on January 15, 2021 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Unocking your hip flexors and why it is so important:

 

The "Hidden Survival Muscle" In Your Body Missed By

Modern Physicians That Keep Millions Of Men And Women

Defeated By Pain, Frustrated With Belly Fat, And Struggling

To Feel Energized Every Day…

 

… because it's tight hip flexors.

 

 

 

You see, our hip flexors are the engine through which our body moves. They control balance, our ability to sit, stand, twist, reach, bend, walk and step.

Everything goes through the hips.

And when our hip flexors tighten it causes a lot of problems in ordinarily healthy and active people, like us.

Before I reveal how most people end up having tight hip flexors yet never realize it, let me introduce myself.

My name is Mike Westerdal and I'm a national best-selling fitness author, sports nutrition specialist, personal trainer, Iron Man magazine contributor and founder of the internet's longest-standing strength site, CriticalBench.com.

In a moment, I'll reveal to you the 10 Key Moves you need to loosen your hip flexors and unlock the hidden power in your body.

But first, let me explain just how deep-rooted the problem is.

 

 

https://www.unlockmyhips.com/?hop=mm3584" target="_blank">https://www.unlockmyhips.com/?hop=mm3584

I thank the author Rick Weslerdal CPT CHECK THIS OUT

11 Dynamic Stretch Exercises

Posted on December 22, 2020 at 7:55 AM Comments comments (0)

I found these awesome stretches - note will do in online classes today with options not in the article.

11 Dynamic Stretch Exercises To Assist With Massaging Hard To Reach Muscles For Instant Relief

 

Stiff joints and tight muscles:

https://www.gymguider.com/stretch-exercises-mobility-stiff-joints-and-tight-muscles/" target="_blank">https://www.gymguider.com/stretch-exercises-mobility-stiff-joints-and-tight-muscles/


Will add recording later today with options for those with knee & hip modifiations.



canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series - featuring the Personal Training Summit

Posted on November 12, 2020 at 3:35 PM Comments comments (0)

�� Join me for the explosive finale to the canfitpro 2020 Virtual Series – featuring the Personal Training Summit!⁠

��️‍♀️ With 20+ sessions and intensives, 20+ presenters and 6 specialized tracks to choose from, it’s the must-attend event of the year.⁠

 

��️‍♂️ Get the one-day pass for just $79.

 

 

Register now at canfitpro2020.org!

 

 

#canfitpro #canfitpro2020

This is the last of 3 Virtual series love the first two with Sargent Ken's sessions fun and so appropriate for how life is now.

Mindy and husband gave some great receipies and allowed us to cook seeing them in their kitchen for eating plant base.


 

 

 

National Coalition of Fitness Clubs Taking Extraordinary Measures to Support COVID-Weary Members and Fitness Professionals

Posted on November 1, 2020 at 3:25 PM Comments comments (0)

National Coalition of Fitness Clubs Taking Extraordinary Measures to Support COVID-Weary Members and Fitness Professionals

Safety, and mental and physical health are top priorities;

$4-billion industry under intense economic pressure, at risk without adequate government support;

"Canadians are in real danger of losing many of their neighborhood gyms and boutique studios"

EDMONTON, AB, Oct. 20, 2020 /CNW/ - Keeping everyone in Canada as safe as possible and focused on their physical and mental health during an unprecedented pandemic is the guiding priority of more than 6,000 fitness clubs, gyms, and studios from coast-to-coast.

 

 

 

Fitness Industry Council of Canada (FIC) has committed to meeting or exceeding government and health authority guidelines that have been proven to be effective at minimizing risk and virus transmission. FIC has also committed to working collaboratively with health and government officials to develop guidelines and regulations that prioritize health and safety.

"We know the positive impact exercise has on the physical, psychological, and social health of people, and are committed to providing safe solutions," said Scott Wildeman, President, FIC. "We want to work as an active partner with government and healthcare officials and help them make evidence-based decisions to protect our members and employees — and keep our doors open."

"We're welcoming back increasing numbers of people in our gyms and studios, but we also desperately need government support to ensure we remain sustainable in this new normal of restrictions and shutdowns."

Canadian fitness facilities generate nearly $4 billion in revenue annually and employ tens of thousands of people. FIC represents all levels of facilities, from the largest chains – GoodLife Fitness, Orangetheory Fitness, MOVATI Athletic, Énergie Cardio, GYMVMT, Trevor Linden Club 16, etc. – to the thousands of smaller, independent studios and gyms that are also struggling to survive amid capacity restrictions, rolling closures and threats of future shutdowns.

"As a small business owner, the shutdown in the spring stretched finances about as far as they could possibly go," said Jeff Ardron, President and GM of Fitness Unlimited Athletic Club in Maple Ridge, B.C. "We were able to reopen, but not all gyms and studios were as lucky. We have received a lot of support from our members, but if another closure were to happen, I'm not sure what the outcome would be."

"Most fitness facilities are operating at approximately 60 per cent of the pre-pandemic revenues," said Wildeman. "At the same time, they've made significant investments in additional personal protective equipment, cleaning and sanitizing equipment, staff training, in addition to other measures to protect their employees and members. Canadians are in real danger of losing many of their neighborhood gyms and boutique studios."

 

 

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/national-coalition-of-fitness-clubs-taking-extraordinary-measures-to-support-covid-weary-members-and-fitness-professionals-836410899.html" target="_blank">click on link for more information: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/national-coalition-of-fitness-clubs-taking-extraordinary-measures-to-support-covid-weary-members-and-fitness-professionals-836410899.html

 

Returning to Campus - What to do

Posted on August 11, 2020 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Returning to Campus - What to do

Thunder Bay

 

In the coming weeks and months, more students, faculty, and staff will gradually begin returning to our campuses. As such, and in light of recent announcements from provincial and federal health authorities, new health and safety measures are being implemented to safeguard our University community.

 

While all Lakehead University employees are still to follow the current guidance that indicates if you can work from home you should, below are the measures all faculty and staff must follow if they intend to return to working on our campuses from time-to-time, temporarily, part-time, or full-time.

 

When you do return to campus, you'll notice that new signage has been put up in many areas to help inform you of some of the changes to our campuses, including new health and safety regulations, the direction to be followed in certain spaces such as stairwells, and other appropriate precautions in keeping with public health authorities' guidelines.

 

The information on this page is to be considered part of a living document - to be updated, as required, in keeping with provincial, federal, and public health announcements, regulations and guidelines.

 

Mandatory Reintegration Training

 

A critical component of a safe return to campus is a shared understanding of proper measures to protect the health and safety of everyone. To this end, staff returning to campus are expected to complete a brief course focused on an overview of COVID-19, health and safety guidelines, and infection control measures.

 

Masking

 

Wearing a mask contributes greatly to the reduction of the spread of COVID-19 (in addition to frequent hand washing and physical distancing). Once you have completed your reintegration training and are ready to return to campus, be advised that masks are now to be worn in all indoor public spaces where physical distancing may not be possible.

 

A mask, or face covering, is understood to be a medical or non-medical mask or similar, partial facial covering such as folded handkerchiefs/bandanas, scarves, and other materials that could serve to cover one's nose, mouth and chin - thereby establishing a barrier to limit the potential spread of respiratory droplets.

 

Visit the Health Canada information page to learn about non-medical masks and face-coverings, including their appropriate use and limitations.

 

Exemptions to masking

 

Where physical/social distancing is certain, here are circumstances when masks or face coverings may be removed in an indoor space on our campuses:

 

If you are working in a private office, or alone in a room. However, a mask should be worn while walking through buildings to and from such private spaces as you never know when you might suddenly come into contact with others.

In classroom/class settings, instructors may use their judgement when deciding if masks/face coverings will be required while considering everyone's comfort level, the tasks to be performed, and the need to maintain physical distancing.

In office spaces, supervisors may use their judgement when deciding if masks/face coverings will be required while considering everyone's comfort level, tasks, and the need to maintain physical distancing.

Lakehead University also follows the Thunder Bay and Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Units' acknowledgement that masking may not be appropriate or possible for everyone. The following are exemptions defined by these District Health Units:

 

Children under the age of 2 years old, or children under the age of 5 years either chronologically or developmentally who refuse to wear a mask and cannot be persuaded to do so by their caregiver;

Individuals with medical conditions rendering them unable to safely wear a mask, including breathing difficulties, cognitive difficulties, hearing or communication difficulties;

Individuals who cannot wear or are unable to apply or remove a mask without assistance, including those who are accommodated under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, or who have protections under the Ontario Human Rights Code (R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19), as amended;

Any person who is employed by or is an agent of the Operator of an Enclosed Public Space and is within or behind a physical barrier (e.g. Plexiglass).

Anyone who is unable to remove the mask without help;

Anyone wearing a face covering that would inhibit the ability to breathe in any way such as, but not limited to, during moderate to intense physical activity (such as running) or activity that would preclude its use (such as swimming); and

Individuals who cannot wear face coverings for any religious reasons.

Where to get masks

 

While students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to obtain their own masks or face coverings, Lakehead University has ordered masks to be given to employees returning to campus. Watch for a Bulletin notice informing everyone how to get your Lakehead mask.

 

While on campus

 

When you return to our campuses to work, Lakehead University and public health guidelines maintain that masking, physical distancing, thorough and frequent hand-washing, and disinfecting your private work offices/spaces is the best way to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Please do your part to help protect others.

 

Approved disinfectants are available for purchase through Physical Plant.

 

Hand sanitizer, wipes and disposable masks are available for purchase through the bookstore.

 

Classrooms

 

As some courses will be delivered within classrooms as part of hybrid class delivery models, measures are being taken to ensure that such spaces are scheduled appropriately and cleaned between uses. The number of people a classroom or similar space may accommodate will be limited so as to adhere to physical distancing rules.

 

Enforcement of Health and Safety Measures

 

On July 13 and 24, 2020, respectively, the Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Unit and the Thunder Bay District Health Unit announced that non-medical masks or face coverings must be worn when entering an enclosed public space. These regulations apply to all employees and members of the public and are issued under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act.

 

Procedures to address violations of social distancing, masking, and other health and safety measures on Lakehead properties are the responsibility of the University and will be enforced through existing codes that protect members of our University community.

 

Lakehead University's COVID-19 Transition Committee and its Working Groups

 

Click here to learn more about what Lakehead University's COVID-19 Transition Committee and its Working Groups are doing to help prepare our campuses for our next phase of operations.

 

Notice from the Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic) - PTR Information Session

Thunder Bay

 

There will be an Information Session held on Promotion, Tenure and Renewal (PTR) process and procedures.

 

Please note the following date, time and connection information:

 

Tuesday, Aug. 18 from 1 to 2:30 pm via Zoom

https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/j/92090352794?pwd=d1ZmMGZ4V0x6YU5BU2hiRWg3ejdk...

Password: 98765

Faculty members who are considering making application for promotion, tenure or renewal or who are interested in knowing more about the PTR process are encouraged to attend.

 

Request your Online Site for the Upcoming Academic Sessions

Thunder Bay

 

Instructors are reminded to submit their requests for an online mycourselink (D2L) course site for the upcoming academic sessions.

 

Click the Request an Online Course Site button located at the top of your class roster in myInfo, and you'll receive an email to your Lakehead University email account confirming the successful set-up of your online course site.

 

For more information, please contact the Teaching Commons at mycourselink@lakeheadu.ca.

 

PLEASE NOTE: A new site request will need to be made each time a course is offered. Content can be migrated from a previously used site to the new one by selecting the Migrate Course option on the Request Form.

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

Posted on August 1, 2020 at 12:45 AM Comments comments (1)

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

Thank you to                                     By Paige Smith • Nov 14, 2019

How to Avoid Getting Nauseous When You Exercise

You’re halfway through a three-mile run, intense pilates class, or round of your weight circuit when — suddenly — you’re feeling nauseous.

 

Despite your best intentions to push on with your workout, you’re forced to stop, sit down, and struggle just to take steady breaths. Within moments, your body feels zapped of energy. What little strength you have left is used to fight back a gag reflex.

 

Sound familiar?

 

Exercise-induced nausea is a common phenomenon, one that most people — fitness experts and novices alike — have experienced at some point.

 

For more tips about how to maximize your workout sign up for Openfit for free today.

 

 

Kyrin Dunston, MD says vomiting during or after exercise usually has to do with one or more of the following factors:

 

hydration (too little or too much)

nutrition (whether or not you’ve eaten, and what you ate)

workout intensity vs. baseline fitness level

specific exercise

anxiety

gastrointestinal dysfunction

a serious medical condition

The cause of your exercise-induced nausea may not be evident at first, but one thing’s for sure: throwing up when you’re trying to work up a sweat is zero fun. Not only does it derail your workout, but it also makes it difficult to feel motivated and excited to continue challenging your body.

 

The good news? That turbulent feeling in your stomach is avoidable if you take the proper precautions.

 

 

nauseous after workout- drink water

 

1. Eat and Hydrate Properly

To prevent nausea, be smart about when and how you fuel your body before a workout. Kristin McGee, an ACE-certified personal trainer based in New York City, recommends giving yourself at least an hour to digest a meal before you start moving. Keep pre-workout meals light, and be sure to include both proteins and carbs if you can. If you’re hungry and can’t wait an hour to work out, opt for a banana, handful of raisins, or an energy gel, all of which can be digested quickly.

 

As for fluids, make sure you’re hydrated, but don’t overdo it. There’s no need to chug all the water in your 24-ounce bottle 10 minutes before you start your run — an eight-ounce glass or two will do the trick.

 

And though sports drinks can help replenish lost minerals, the high sugar content of many of them can subvert your hydration efforts. Replace these sugary beverages with Openfit Fuel, our energizing pre-workout supplement, which contains no added sugars.

 

Dunston says it’s important to consume sports drinks in accordance with the duration and intensity level of your workout. Good old-fashioned H20 is sufficient under most circumstances, but for those seeking an edge during particularly tough or long workouts, try a low-sugar sports drink that maximizes fluid absorption and replenishes lost electrolytes.

 

Possible Cause: Too much or too little food and water

Dunston says dehydration — when your body doesn’t have enough water to function optimally — is a significant cause of exercise-induced nausea. The other possibility? You guzzled too much H2O, and your stomach is overly full.

 

“How recently you have eaten and what you ate before your workout can be issues as well,” says Dunston. “Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is particularly a problem if you work out in the morning and don’t eat anything beforehand.” If that’s the case, Dunston says you’ll usually experience both nausea and dizziness.

 

Overeating before exercise also pits your stomach against your muscles. Dunston says the body moves blood to the gastrointestinal system to help with digestion, but if you exercise on a full stomach, your body also has to send blood to your muscles to support their movements. When your body tries to handle both digestion and strenuous exercise simultaneously, there isn’t enough blood flow to assist with digestion, Dunston says. Nausea can result.

 

“Nausea is a precursor to vomiting,” says Dunston. “Dumping out the food in the stomach is one way the body can alleviate the blood supply problem.”

 

 

nauseous after workout- take it easy

 

2. Take it easy

If you haven’t prepared your body for a specific type of exercise or intensity (like running five miles at a seven-minute pace, or swimming laps non-stop for 30 minutes), don’t go at it full force. When you’re not used to a certain speed, distance, or movement, it’s essential to ease into it and adjust your expectations accordingly.

 

“Keep the intensity level within your tolerated range,” says Dunston. In other words, don’t assume you can handle a hilly six-mile trail run if you’ve only ever jogged on the comparatively flat streets of your neighborhood.

 

Make an effort to approach new workouts and movements with equal parts enthusiasm and caution. When you do feel ready to increase your pace, distance, or reps, do it gradually, and be sure to notice when your body starts to feel overworked so you can back off before you hit your breaking point.

 

Possible Cause: Overexertion

The line between pushing yourself to run two more minutes and pushing yourself to the point of nausea can be blurry. Exercise isn’t supposed to be easy (it’s meant to challenge you, after all), but it shouldn’t make you so sick that you can’t complete a workout.

 

McGee says overexertion can lead to nausea.

 

“If you’re exercising at an intense level or pushing yourself past your threshold, your body reacts by increasing blood flow to your muscles, heart, lungs, and brain so your body can process energy and continue working out,” she says. “When this happens, blood is diverted away from your stomach and that can make you feel sick.”

 

 

nauseous after workout- warm up

 

3. Warm-Up Properly and Avoid Exercising in Extreme Conditions

If you go from sitting at your desk to running at full speed without a sufficient transition period, you’re going to overexert yourself before you even get into your workout.

 

To prevent nausea by overexertion, McGee says it’s crucial to warm up your muscles before you start working them. Depending on your workout, you can jog lightly for five to 10 minutes, walk briskly for a few minutes, or do some dynamic stretching to boost blood flow, activate your central nervous system, and optimize strength, power, and range of motion.

 

Another tip? Avoid working out in extreme conditions, says McGee. Exercising in overly humid or hot environments can lead to heat exhaustion, nausea, and dizziness if you’re not careful.

 

If you love hot yoga or outdoor runs in the summer, don’t stress — stay adequately hydrated and start slow to give your body time to adjust to the high temperature.

 

 

Other Possible Causes of Nausea While Exercising

1. Disorienting movements

“Specific exercises, particularly those that contract the abdominal wall muscles and those that require head twisting can induce nausea as well,” Dunston says.

 

Moves like crunches apply extra pressure to the stomach, says Dunston, while twisting motions can cause the inner-ear vestibular system — the network of sensory components in charge of our sense of balance — to become disoriented.

 

Anyone who’s ever closed their eyes during sit-ups or tried to do camel pose at the end of a yoga class knows what happens when your body feels off balance: you get nauseous.

 

2. Performance anxiety

If you’re involved in a competitive event in which there’s enormous pressure to succeed — like a race, sporting match, or weightlifting competition — you might experience occasional or constant performance anxiety, which can cause you to feel overly nervous and nauseous.

 

You don’t have to take the starting line of a 10K or Tough Mudder to feel anxious, though. Dunston says any exercise under pressure can cause serious nerves. “It could be as simple as being in a new [workout] class where you are concerned with keeping up and looking good,” says Dunston.

 

3. Larger health concerns

Dunston says exercise can sometimes exacerbate the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders and other health conditions, causing nausea and other problems.

 

“If the nausea persists despite addressing all of the above concerns, it’s best to see a doctor to be evaluated for underlying potential health issues that need to be addressed,” says Dunston.

 

 

What to Do if Your Workout Makes You Nauseous

Even when you think you’ve done everything right, sometimes nausea just happens. When that horrible, sick-to-your-stomach sensation starts to creep up on you, Dunston says it’s best to rest for a few minutes. Stop what you’re doing and find a something sturdy to sit or lean against.

 

If the nausea doesn’t subside, “it might be best to call it quits for the day or lower the intensity of the activity,” says Dunston.

https://www.openfit.com/avoid-throwing-up-after-exercise#:~:text=Possible%20Cause%3A%20Too%20much%20or,your%20stomach%20is%20overly%20full.


I am sharing this because met a young lady yesterday that gets nauseous every class she does says she likes feeling.

For a healthier workout recognizing this is important next step is to learn how to learn to stop.

Have a healthy day.  Anne